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Full text of "Weymouth High School/Technical High School yearbook"

1941 



PROPERTY OF THE 



TUFTS LIBRARY 

WEYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 

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REFLECTOR. . . 1941 
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1941 
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Class Colors 
BLUE and SILVER 



Class Motto 
HONOR BE OUR GUIDE 



WEYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL 

Weymouth, Massachusetts 



The Reflector is published by the students of Weymouth 
High School, Weymouth, Massachusetts. Editor, Sylvia 
Steele; Business Manager, Walter Blair; Faculty 
Adviser, Prescott B. Brown. 

Printed by Students of the Printing Department, 
Weymouth Vocational School, 
Harry F. Duncan, Instructor. 




THE TUFTS LIBRARf 
WEYMOUTH, MASS. 




In grateful appreciation of the kindness and 
thoughtfulness of one who, during sixteen years 
of service as a teacher, and four years as our 
principal at Weymouth High School, has con- 
stantly aided the students with his assistance and 
helpful advice, we, the Class of 1941, dedicate 
this Year Book to Mr. Wallace L. Whittle. 



The moon has been behind a tree, 
But now it rises high, 
To show us where our goal must be- 
That star up in the sky. 
We leave behind our childhood toys; 
Our views and thoughts have changed; 
We now are lacing newer joys, 
In a much, much wider range. 
That same old moon will light our way, 
Wherever we may roam; 
So, when we part with friends to-day, 
We'll have that thought of home. 
We should not falter in our step, 
Nor from our duty hide; 
But with a firm and steady aim 
Let "Honor be our guide." 



Four- Year Honor Roll 



Elizabeth Agnes Fahey 



Parker Willard Bates 



Margaret Lesenechal 



Fredrick Norton Bates Chase 



Margaret Belle Morrill 



Muriel Florence Cormack 



John Paul O'Connor 
Sylvia Jean Steele 
Ruth Lystad Stub 



Dorothy Helen Crawford 



Helen Eita Cromwell 



Marjorie Fisher 



Merle Marilyn Workman 



□ n 



COflTEHlS 



Dedication 5 

Class Ode and Four- Year Honor Roll 6 

Faculty 8 

Class Officers 11 

Vocational Officers 12 

Salutatory Address 13 

Valedictory Address 17 

Class History 21 

Class Prophecy 29 

Class Census 44 

Senior Section and Who's Who 45 

School Activities 105 

Class Will 125 

Baby Parade 128 

The Perfect Senior 131 

Advertisements . . . . . . . . . . .132 




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WALLACE L. WHITTLE, Principal 
He is the shepherd of our fold. 
His motto, dearer to him than gold: 
"To live as gently as I can; 
To be no matter where, a man." 



THOMAS A. LYONS, Assistant Principal 

Mathematics 

The opinion of the strongest is always the 

best. 

VELMA E. ABBOTT, Clerk 

Her pleasant nature endears her to the hearts 
of all. 

MARY M. LAMBE, Assistant Clerk 
Dainty and neat, with laughing blue eyes, 
Always eager and willing to oblige. 

HARRY ARLANSON, Coach 

"He marks, not that you won or lost, but 
how you played the game." 

PAUL H. BATES, French 
"I'll be merry and free; 
I'll be sad for naebody." 

ESTHER L. BENSON, Home Economics 
"We may live without friends, 
We may live without books, 
But civilized man cannot live without cooks." 

BARBARA R. BICKNELL, Mathematics, 

Science 

So tall, so blond, so fair is she, 
That students learn math happily. 

PRECOTT B. BROWN, English, History 
"Quod dixi, dixi." 

ERNESTINE R. CANNING, French 
Firm in her loyalty she stood. 

PAUL C. CLEAVES, English 
His voice is low, his manner mild; 
Upon him Fortune surely smiled. 

MARIE E. CONROY, French 
A good French teacher and very fair, too. 
"Bonjour, mademoiselle! Comment allez-vous?" 

JOHN K. DELAHUNT, Economics, Science 
"Now please, students, just label your draw- 
ing, so I'll know it's a grasshopper, not an 
elephant." 

BEATRICE ESCOTT, Home Economics 

"Good order is the foundation of all good 
things." 

ALICE K. FAY, Commercial 

These strokes and curves and little hooks 
Your practise every day 
Will make you good stenographers, 
According to Miss Fay. 

ELEANOR FREEMAN, German 

To be a friend is one of the greatest assets 
in life. 

JOHN T. GANNON, Latin 

A jolly, good fellow, alert and alive, 

An excellent coach for the basketball five. 

JOHN T. GHIORSE, English, Science 
An athlete and musician, all in one, 
Compose a teacher with whom we have fun. 



SHEILA M. GROSS, Librarian 
Volumes hidden in many nooks, 
She can find those misplaced books. 

WALTER C. GUTTERSON, Citizenship, 

History 

"Knowledge is itself a power." 

OLIVE E. HACKETT, Commercial 

"Patience is a flower that grows not in every 
garden." 

KATHARINE M. HALE, English, Science 

"A merry companion is music on a journey." 

INEZ E. HOAG, Physical Education 
Miss Hoag is nimble, 
Miss Hoag is quick, 

But she doesn't jump over the candlestick. 

EVERETT N. HOLLIS, Commercial 
He lures you into the law of the land, 
And from you all he will demand 
Definition after definition until you cannot 
stand. 

LILLIAN JEFTS, Spanish 

"What is virtue but repose of mind?" 

DOROTHY A. JENKINS, Commercial 

"Our patience null achieve more than force." 

PHILIP T. JONES, Georgaphy, History 

"Sincere, plain hearted, hospitable, kind." 

FRANCIS X. KELLY, Commercial 

A sense of humor is a credit to any man. 

MARGARET K. LANGFORD, Commercial 
"Good advice 
Is beyond price." 

NORMAN D. LOUD, Science 
"Young in limbs, in knowledge old." 

CLARENCE R. LYOND, Science 
"Thou hast wit at will." 

HELEN G. LYONS, English, Histoiy 

"A happy-tempered bringer of the best out 
of the worst." 

DOROTHY G. MacGREGOR. Commercial 
To understand and be understood 
Are natural qualities of one so good. 

ELEANOR R. MADIGAN, English, Spanish 
"In youth and beauty wisdom is but rare." 

JOHN F. MARTIN, History, Latin 
"While we learn history, we make it." 

GEORGE J. MCCARTHY, English, Geography 
Ahvays. helpful, always kind, 
Knowledge and diligence ever in mind. 

MARY E. McMORROW, English 
Miss McMorrow, fair and jolly 
To try to match her ivould be folly. 



□ n 




ROBERT E. MITCHELL, Geography, History 
History is the subject taught; 
We all know, it is not for naught. 

HELEN M. NORRIS, Commercial 

Her admirers are many, her detractors few, 
As each year the old class makes way for the 
new. 

VIRGINIA NYE, English, French 

"Virtue is woman who speaks softly and to 
the point." 

ORAL A. PAGE, Physical Education 

"By nature honest, by experience wise, 
Healthy by temperance and exercise." 

DOROTHY L. PETERSON, Physical Education 
Here is one who in our esteem 
Would be an asset on any team. 

ANITA L. PETRUCCI, English, French 
"Small in stature, great in mind." 

ALVAH RAYMOND, Mathematics 

"Men of courage, men of sense, and men of 
letters are frequent; but a true gentleman is 
what one seldom sees." 

HELENA F. REIDY, Latin 
"To do my best and let it stand— 
The record of my brain and hand." 

ROSE SILVERMAN, Commercial 

You wish to be a typist of very great renown' 
Take lessons from Miss Silverman, and you 
will win the crown. 



EVELYN SILVESTER, Drawing 
"The day is short, the work is much." 

EVA SKALA, Home Economics 
Small and efficient, 
Jolly and patient. 
"A friend, indeed, 
For one in need." 

JAMES F. STEELE, Economics, History 
"He is a gentleman, because his nature 
Is kind and affable to every creature." 

GEORGE O. STEWART, Mathematics 
He hath mirth w''hin his eyes, 
And is sunny as the skies. 

HERBERTA L. STOCK WELL, Nurse 
" 'Twos her thinking of others made you 
think of her." 

MARY F. TOOMEY, English, Mathematics 
"Softly speak and sweetly smile." 

MARTHA VINING, Latin 

Caesar, Virgil, Cicero, 
Latin syntax of long ago, 
Grammar -and pronunciation- 
She teaches us with inspiration. 

ALICE WHITE, English 
"Soft smiles by human kindness bred." 

MADELYN M. WILSON, English, History 
"Gay good nature sparkles in her eyes." 

M. JEAN YOUNG, Commercial 
"All men commend patience, altliough few 
be willing to practise it." 



★ 



Norfolk County Agricultural School 

Weymouth Branch 

HILMER S. NELSON, Director HAROLD R. NELSON, Assistant 

"Wisdom from his heart, Wit font his lips." "Blessed is he who has found his work. 



Weymouth Vocational School 



FRANCIS E. WHIPPLE, Director 

"Few things are impossible to one with dili- 
gence and skill." 

LEWIS H. BACON, JR., Auto Mechanics 
"Speech is silver; silence is golden." 

JAMES F. BOLAND, Sheet Metal 

"Diligence is the keynote of success." 

D. EVERETT BRYAN, Auto Mechanics 
"Actions speak louder than words." 

HAROLD E. CLARK, Sheet Metal 
"Jolly as the day is long." 

HARRY F. DUNCAN, Printing 
"His aim— to make business a pleasure." 

GEORGE H. KLAY, Sheet Metal 

"Always willing to lend a helping hand." 



OTTO H. MAHN, Printing, Placement 
"A perfect gentleman from head to toe." 

JALMAR N. NELSON 

Citizenship, Mathematics, Science 
"His cherry smile and, 'Good morning!' starts 
the day off right." 

RAY G. PARKER, Mechanical Drawing 

"The mildest manners and the gentlest heart." 

HAROLD C. SHERWOOD, Cabinetmaking 

"Accuracy is his password." 

WALDO H. SWAN, English, Science 
"A quiet tongue shows a wise head." 

JOSEPH K. WHITTEMORE, 

Citizenship, English, History 
"An understanding character worth his weight 
in gold." 



□ n 




PARKER WILLARD BATES, Vocational School ; Class President 
COLIN CAMPBELL GILLIS, Vice-President LEONARD HOLBROOK NADELL, Secretary-Treasurer 
WILLIAM AUGUSTINE CONNELL, Class Marshal 

□ a 



SALUTATORY ADDRESS 



IT'S UP TO US 

By FREDERICK NORTON BATES CHASE 




RIENDS of the class of 1941, we welcome you on this memorable day. 



Mr. Thrbadeau and members of the School Committee, we bid you welcome 
down the long corridors of education to this bright day. 

Mr. Thibadeau and members of the School Committee, we bid you welcome 
and thank you for the opportunities you have given us in Weymouth schools. 

Mothers and fathers, and those dearest to us, we extend our welcome to you. 

IT'S UP TO US 

Every newspaper we scan to-day tells stories of horror and destruction raging 
in Europe and Asia. We are appalled to think that civilized white men could 
wreak such desolation. Gladly we turn our eyes to America, to bright green fields, 
to the quiet security and rugged splendor of our national parks and forests; and 
we rejoice that we live in a land not yet scarred by war's ravages. 

But America is scarred, terribly scarred, not by a dictator's greedy lust, but by 
our hands. Yes, our own avarice and thoughtlessness has caused fearful desola- 
tion in this beautiful country. 

From the beginning, America has been a land wealthy in natural resources. 
When the first settlers came here, they found dense tracts of virgin timber and 
many deep navigable rivers. Crossing the Appalachians, they discovered broad, 
rolling prairies. Many years later, pioneers of a different type discovered vast 
deposits of minerals and fuels beneath the earth. 

As is usual amid abundance, waste of these advantages occurred. Millions of 
acres of forests were burned just to get rid of them. The plains were robbed of 
their fertility. The mines were cleaned out of all the best grade ore, easiest to 
obtain, and then abandoned. 

One of the greatest causes of waste was the ruinous farming and overgrazing 
practised in former years. When the land was exhausted, the homesteader would 
move to a new plot, leaving the old one with no protective grass covering to hold 
the soil. The ranchers did the same by grazing too many cows per acre. The grass 
was cut short and then stamped out by the steers. Since the Great Plains are 
subject to strong winds, it was not long before the rich, loose soil had been blown 
into other states. 

Water now had a chance to do its destructive work. Formerly the grass helped 
absorb the water and then allowed it to seep off gradually. With the grass gone, 
the water rushed along the surface, cutting deep and wide gullies in the earth 
in a few hours. Such carelessness has turned large productive areas into sterile 

desert wastes. 

A second exorbitant waste has occured in our forests. With early settlers it 
was a case of man against the forest, not man with the forests. Because this feel- 



□ a 



ing prevailed, large tracts of fine timber were destroyed. The private lumber 
concerns would "mine" a forest; that is, cut all the oldest trees, destroy the young- 
er trees, and leave the forest buried beneath the slash. Fire then followed in the 
wake, not only burning the trees, but also ruining the rich top soil, preventing 
or retarding future growth. 

The forests play an important part in our economic, industrial and social 
life. Economically, they give several million dollars income to the government 
each year; industrially, lumbering and its many by-products constitue an impor- 
each year; industrilly, lumbering and its many by-products contitute an impor- 
some of the most picturesque and magnificent splendors in the world as well as 
providing excellent vacation opportunities. When the forests are despoiled by in- 
rivers, overflows and erodes the land, and forces the farmers out. When the slopes 
are verdant and dense, the trees slow up the drainage. The roots hold the water, 
allowing it to seep into the rivers slowly and steadily throughout the summer. 
Floods are prevented and droughts are minimized. 

When a mountain slope is burned over, it exposes the loose soil to the driving 
rains and powerful winds. Rains wash the soil down the slopes and into the 
rivers, which it then chokes up. Nothing now checks the water; so it floods the 
rivers, overflows and erodes the land, and forces the farmers out. When the slopes 
are verdant and dense, the trees slow up the drainage. The roots hold the water, 
allowing it to seep into the rivers slowly and steadily throughout the summer. 
Floods are prevented and droughts are minimized. 

Our nation first became cognizant of the extravagant waste when Theodore 
Roosevelt was elected President. Roosevelt established the United States Forestry 
service, and placed the capable Gifford Pinchot in charge of it. The Reclamation 
Act was passed, which provided irrigation for the Western states. More land was 
taken from private use and made into national parks. Minerals and water power 
were placed under government control. To Roosevelt we owe a vote of thanks, 
for it was he more than anyone else who revealed the waste to us and instructed 
us in how to cure and prevent it. 

Since then the government has taken great strides in conservation. Boulder 
Dam on the Colorado River, Shoshone Dam in Wyoming, Elephant Butte Dam 
in Montana are monuments of progress in irrigation projects. Crater Lake 
National Park in Oregon, Yellowstone National Park in three states, Sequoia 
National Park in California, all these and many more are spots of indescribable 
beauty, preserved for posterity. Lumbering, mining, and the use of water re- 
sources are carefully supervised by the Forestry Service. 

To-day we have the Soil Conservation Service, and the Civilian Conservation 
Corps. Both have done magnificent work in saving devastated farm lands and forest 
areas. The S. C. C. is waging an unceasing battle against dust and drought. Irri- 
gation projects are being carried forward everywhere. Water eroded gullies and 
plains are dammed to hold water, and tough young trees planted over them. 
Soon erosion is stopped and another victory is chalked up. 

In the forests, work of a similar nature is being successfully carried out. Burned 
over areas are cleaned up and strong young trees are planted to hold the soil. 
Soon a fine stand of timber has grown up. Clean broad roads are being construct- 
ed to make access into the woods easier for sightseers, campers and fire fighters. 
A great deal of work has been done in cleaning up slash and left over lumber 
cuttings. So fast are young seedlings being used for replacing that there is a great 
shortage, notwithstanding the millions of them grown in nurseries. 



This work must be carried forward in the future. Co-operation and team play 
are necessary from everyone in order successfully to complete the tremendous task. 

As in all other fields, education holds a prominent position. Colleges and 
universities all over the country offer courses in agriculture and forestry. In 
the grade schools, clubs and organizations foster a sympathetic outlook toward 
nature in eager young minds. The government extends aid and advice to all 
who need or desire it. Colleges are constantly seeking to improve and increase 
farm production. 

It must be remembered that the United States is a government of the people, 
and this government is most effective when the people get behind it and give 
their support. That puts it directly up to us. We must do our part to support 
conservation. Theodore Roosevelt once said, "When the soil is gone, man must 
go, and the process doesn't take long." It's up to us to see that the nation we 
give to posterity is not scarred and blackened but green and beautiful. In this 
time of national emergency, it is vital that our resources be conserved, so that 
we may help to strengthen the organized might of America in the critical years 
ahead. It's up to us. 



□ 16 n 



VALEDICTORY ADDRESS 



THIS RESPONSIBILITY 

By MURIEL FLORENCE CORMACK 

HE scene which you see before you is a familiar one throughout the nation. 
To most people it represents the end of a public school education. In reality, 
it is the beginning, the beginning of our careers in a country dedicated to free- 
dom. 

I repeat, it is a country dedicated to freedom; a country whose educational 
system has been widened to train a greater number of young men and women 
than ever before; a country where students are allowed the maximum of freedom 
in their selection of subjects and courses. 

The most vital question facing us to-day is: "How have we exercised this 
choice?" Have we planned our careers carefully? Have we given adequate con- 
sideration to our choice of vocation? This choice, once made, is an important 
one, and to-day may well be the deciding day of our lives. 

Opportunities this year will be better and more numerous than for some 
time past. Actually, more people will find employment in America this year 
than in any previous year in the history of our country. Our factories, stores, and 
offices will employ from three to six million more workers in 1941 than in 1940. 

Many in this graduating class will take their places in the business world 
immediately. Others will continue their education. All must choose a career 
sooner or later. Careful consideration should be given to this choice, because a 
change of mind after a few years of work results in a great loss of time. And 
conservation of time and energy in the lives of human beings is conservation 
unparalleled. 

For those having mechanical ability the question of choosing a vocation 
is comparatively easy. One of the best prospects for employment in 1941 will be 
found in the defence industries. We, in this area, have already felt the tremen- 
dous surge in business resulting from this increased demand for workers. Nearly 
one hundred thousand new workers are needed now in these industries through- 
out the nation. Forty thousand more will be needed early next year. Mechanical 
ability and a desire for this type of work should prompt a selection in this 
field. 

Others with some one special skill or outstanding talent know the road 
which they will take toward their goal of successful living. Many who have 
developed useful hobbies will continue to follow them to earn their livelihood. 
Their interest in their work will insure their happiness. 

Many others have planned to continue their education in colleges and busi- 
ness schools. They have made this decision after months, yes, even years, of 
careful planning. Their parents and instructors have been consulted and have 
given their advice. Their capabilities have been measured; proper guidance has 
been given. Nothing will, and nothing can, deter them from their choice. 




Thus far, I have included only those whose goal is set. They have given 
adequate consideration to their careers. They will carry out their plans without 
any great loss of time. 

Many, however, have failed to consider the future at all. It is the same way 
throughout the world. It is one of the characteristics of human nature. Young 
people drift along with the tide. They feel that there is still time. They think, 
"To-morrow is another day; let us wait until to-morrow." For them this appeal 
is most urgent. The time to make that choice cannot be put off any longer. This 
does not mean that it should be made in an instant, nor that it should be a mere 
whim. It does mean that careful, subtantial planning should begin at once. 

To many, the fact that defence industries are booming implies that this is 
the only field in which to seek employment. With no special skill for this work, 
and at the expense of training in another field, they will snatch at the oppor- 
tunity for any employment. Actually, labor statistics for 1941 indicate that many 
more jobs will be available in "non-war" occupations than in the so-called defence 
industries, and an even greater increase in opportunities will be in store during 
1942. 

Therefore, these must analyze themselves and select their outstanding quality. 
They must find out in what field it could be used most successfully. They must 
determine whether or not this field offers the type of employment which they 
would like to follow, and then seek the advice of parents or experts who will 
help them to look ahead. Bear in mind that long-range vision in career planning 
is as vital and necessary as long-range planning in government or business. 

After they have clone this, they must earnestly attack the problem of selling 
themselves. Prepared in this manner, armed with courage instead of self-pity, 
they are bound to find some way toward their established goal, because they are 
prepared. Gilbert Chesterton in considering this same problem once said: "I do 
not believe in a fate that falls on men however they act. But I do believe in a 
fate that falls on them unless they act." 

Mothers and fathers, our choice of careers may take us far from your loving 
(are. but we shall always realize the unselfish part you have played in fashioning 
our lives. 

Mr. Thibadeau and members of the School Committee, may long con- 
tinue your good work of improving and planning the schools of Weymouth to 
give increased opportunities to future classes. 

Mr. Whittle and teachers, to you we owe many thanks for your kind advice, 
guidance, and friendship. May we make for ourselves in the world, a record 
which will repay your work. 

Classmates, let us remember that success in any field will depend on the 
individual. We, and we alone, make our opportunities. The difference between 
a correct and false start may mean the difference between success and failure. For 
our own esteem and the esteem of all these who have made this day possible, 
let us get that correct start; and, through the years, let us always remember our 
class motto— "Honor be our guide." 



S3 E3 




//anon 



FRESHMAN CLASS HISTORY 



Sponsor of Freshman Quarter ....Thomas A. Lyons, Vice-President of W.H.S. 

Announcer _ Phyllis MacDonald, Class Treasurer 

Quizmaster Ruth Mitchell 

Phyllis MacDonald: Ladies and gentlemen, your dial is now turned to station 
W. H. S. It is exactly 1937 by the clock on the studio wall, and that means it's 
time for a feature presentation of the Freshman Broadcasting System. What 
is it? That's right, you're right! It's that quiz program \ou have all been wait- 
ing for, presented by Mr. Thomas A. Lyons, vice-president of W. H. S. The 
questions will be asked by our old quizmaster, Ruth Mitchell. The contestant 
will be chosen from the studio audience. It is now my pleasure to present 
Ruth Mitchell. 

Ruth Mitchell: Thank you; and now, on with the programme. All those contest- 
ants who answer correctly will be rewarded with a, beautiful gold-trimmed 
diploma from W. H. S. Our first contestant is "Don" Drake. "Don", your 
question is: "What is the first thing you remember about W. H. S. in 1 937-' 

Don Drake: The first thing I remember about '37 is the football team. They had 
a good season coming out with the South Shore Championship. 

Ruth Mitchell: Very good, "Don". You couldn't be more correct. The next con- 
testant is Eleanor Hopf. "El", can you name the important event that occurred 
during the football season? 

Eleanor Hopf : I think that would be the Freshman Senior Party. "Russ" Clapp 
and his orchestra furnished the music, and everyone had a good time. 

Ruth Mitchell: That's right, "El". You'll receive your certificate if you will call 
at W. H. S. about June 19, 1941. Our next contestant will be John Delorey. 
John, your question has to do with the third term. What were the important 
events during January and February of '38? 

John Delory: That's a tough one, Ruth, but I can remember a little about it. 
The students gave a very successful dance on the 14th of January, and on Feb- 
ruary 16, the officials of station W. H. S. (the teachers) gave their annual play, 
"Craig's Wife." 

Ruth Mitchell: Wonderful, John; you have a very good memory. And here we 
have "Jim" Fisher. "Jim", what can you remember about the basketball team 
of '38? 

Jim Fisher: That's too easy ! W. H. S. was very successful in '38. They received 
an invitation to the "Tech Tourney" at M. I. T. 

Ruth Mitchell: That is fine, "Jim". I think maybe I can find a diploma in the 
pile for you in June 1941. Well, here comes our next contestant, "Vic" Peter- 
son. What do you remember about '38, "Pete"? 

Victor Peterson: Well, Ruth, I can remember the Operetta. It was presented on 
the 20th and 21st of May. I think "Trial by Jury" was the name. 

Ruth Mitchell: You've guessed it "Pete". Next is Doris O'Connor. Doris can 
you name the last two important events in '38? 

Doris O'Connor: I think the best answer to that would be the Senior Play, 
"Spring Dance"; and the Senior Prom. Am I right? 

□ 22 n 



Ruth Mitchell: Right you are, Doris! I think that will be the last question be- 
cause we have just time for a short announcement by our announcer, Phyllis 
MacDonald. 

Phyllis MacDonald: Ladies and gentleman, with that question we end the first 
quarter of our W. H. S. quiz program. There will be a short pause for station 
identification, and then we shall continue our programme through the facili- 
ties of the Sophomore Broadcasting System. 

Production Staff: 

Ruth Mitchell Betty Hill 

George Reed Rita Keefe 



SOPHOMORE CLASS HISTORY 



Sponsor Mr. Wallace Whittle, President of W.H.S 

Announcer Kay MacAleer, Class Secretary 

Quizmaster John Hoffman 

Kay MacAleer: Hello again! This is your favorite broadcasting station W. H. S- 
What is the correct time, you ask? That's right, it is 1938 on the dot, and time 
for a special feature presented by the Sophomore Broadcasting Company's coast 
to coast network. That special feature is none other than that peppy quiz 
programme sponsored by Mr. Whittle, President of W. H. S. Now to proceed 
with the programme. John Hoffman will ask the contestants questions and the 
ones who answer the most questions correctly, will be awarded a gold key from 
W. H. S. Before we start, I want to remind the audience that this programme is 
completely unrehearsed. Come on now, students, sharpen up your wits and 
reply with the right answers. All set! 

John Hoffman: What significance has "Joe" Crehan to your memory in Novem- 
ber, 1938, John? 

John Delorey: "Joe" Crehan was captain of the football team, which came 
through with five wins, two defeats, and two ties. 

John Hoffman: That's correct, John. Now the second contestant approaches 
the microphone. Harold, what two songs were composed for the High School 
that year? Name the two composers, too, if you can. 

Harold Buker: "Maroon and Gold" and "The Cross of Grey", both of which 
were written by Mr. Norman Loud and Mr. John Ghiorse. The former is a 
football song, and the latter is the Weymouth High School Alma Mater. 

John Hoffman: That's right, you're right! Next comes our third and final con- 
testant in this quiz contest. "Peg", what dance turned out to be a great suc- 
cess in 1938? 

Margaret Donahue: The Athletic Dance sponsored by the Student Council at 
which the Teddy Bears' orchestra played for dancing. 

John Hoffman: Well done, "Peg". The next question goes to our first contestant 
of the second round. Let's go! Johnny, what moving picture did the Chevrolet 
Motor Company put on for us? 



Jului Delorey: They showed us a picture on "Safety," which proved to be inter- 
esting. 

John Hoffman: You're correct, and that makes a perfect score for you so far. 
Keep it up. Let's see what question our next contestant must answer. Harold, 
can you name the outstanding feat accomplished by the wrestling team? 

Harold Buker: Yes, they won the Tufts Tournament in Class A. 

John Hoffman: That's right, good! Another contestant with a perfect score. 
Here comes the final contestant up for her second question. Let's see what your 
question is, "Peg". On what did a District Attorney from Chicago lecture? 

Margaret Donahue: He gave a lecture on "Crime Does Not Pay," which was ex- 
tremely interesting since he, himself, had tried many professional criminals. 

JoJin Hoffman: That's too bad, "Peg," you're wrong. The name of the lecture 
was "Crime Marches On!" Sorry, as that makes the first mistake so far. Better 
luck on your next question. 

John Hoffman: This makes the end of the second round, so let us pause briefly 
for station identification. This is station W. H. S. of the Sophomore Broad- 
casting Company. Now we are all set for our third and final round in the 
battle of wits. John, can you name the play given by the teachers in 1939? 

John Delorey: The play was "George and Margaret." 

John Hoffman: You're right again. Your perfect score still holds out. Here is 
another question on drama. Harold, what was the name of the operetta pro- 
duced by the W. H. S. Glee Club? 

Harold Burlier: It was the "Chimes" of Normandy,'' and the acting was excellent, 
as was the singing. 

John Hoffman: That's right, you're right! "Peg", who put on "You Can't Take- 
It With You?" 

Margaret Donahue: The Senior Class, who did an excellent piece of work in its 
dramatization. 

John Hoffman: Correct. Now our final question goes to our first contestant, 
John Delorey. John, did we hear a lecture on a certain section of our country 
that year? 

John Delorey: Yes, it was "The Old East." 

John Hoffman: You're wrong, that's wrong! The lecture was the "Old West." 
That breaks your perfect record. Now comes the time to give out the award 
which goes to none other than Harold Buker. And now our announcer will 
take over for the remainder of our time. 

Kay MacAleer: It is with pleasure, Harold, that I present to you this golden key 
which should be worth its weight. Sorry, our time is up. Don't forget, we'll, 
be back soon with some more puzzling questions. This is station W. H. S. 
signing off for the Sophomore Broadcasting Company's Network. Good luck 
and good health to all! 

Production Staff: 

Aurie Duplin John Hoffman 

Eleanor French 



JUNIOR CLASS HISTORY 



Sponsor 

Announcer. 
Quizmaster. 



The School Committee 

Warren McKinnon, Vice-President of the Class 
Margaret Bletzer 



Warren McKinnon: Don't turn that dial! You are now tuned in on the W. H. S. 
braodcasting facilities, and we are about to present that captivating Quiz Pro- 
gram presented by the Junior Broadcasting Corporation. We have some ques- 
tions which everyone should know, and the quizmaster will be our own "Peg" 
Bletzer. The contestants will be those who "Yahooti", more commonly known 
to us the "Snooper", has written about. Take it over "Peg" and see if you 
can catch them. 

Peggy Bletzer: Thank you, "Hop", for that work of art. I will remember you 
in my will. Well, enough of that! The winner of this contest will have a front 
seat in the Graduation Exercises next June (We hope!) . The first question 
to-night is, "Who was the football hero on Thanksgiving Day?" Ulick Mahoney 
is the first contestant. You should know that one, Ulick. 

Ulick Mahoney: You bet I do. George Anderson saved the day for Weymouth 
by scoring the only touchdown. 

Peggy Bletzer: Correct! We'll see if we can find some more difficult ones. Here's 
a good one! "Who were the most outstanding football players this season?" 
The next contestant is Betty Fahey. I guess she has the answer to that one on 
the tip of her tongue. Am I right, Betty? 

Betty Fahey: That's right. Both Parker Bates and Alan Sampson received tro- 
phies for their marvelous playing. 

Peggy Bletzer: Very good Betty and now I know you're not just prejudiced. 
We'll see if Sylvia Steele can tell us who were the stars on the basketball team 
this year. 

Syliva Steele: In my estimation, George Bailey and Robert McArthur were the 
best, but Fred Slattery and Cecil Breton were also outstanding. 

Peggy Bletzer: You hit the nail right on the head, Sylvia. Here's one that ought 
to give someone some trouble. "What gave Weymouth High School a Japanese 
air around the middle of February?" You take that one, Kay. 

Kay McAleer: And I thought you were my friend. I'll make a guess, but if it's 
wrong, don't hold it against me. I'll say it was "The Mikado," an operetta with 
Clarence Burrell, Bill Sewell, Portia Stanton, and Betty Fahey playing the lead- 
ing roles. 

Peggy Bletzer: Well, I guess you can't catch a McAleer! We'll see if "Bob" 
Holbrook can tell us what was the topic of an interesting lecture and demon- 
stration by Mr. Sloan in the hall? 

Bob Holbrook: That's easy, liquid air was the topic, and Mr. Sloan demon- 
strated its ability by frying an egg on it. 

Peggy Bletzer: Fine, "Bob", you have a good memory. The next question that 
come up is, "How did our teachers exhibit their talents this year?" That's 
your question, "Bob". See what you can do with it. 



Robert Dahlstrom: I could do a lot, but suppose I should stay strictly to the 
question. They did a fine job of acting in the play, "Our Town," among 
other things. 

Peggy Bletzer: That's right, "Bob". If Sadie Gould was present, maybe she 

could tell us what remarkable new instrument we saw played in the hall? 
Sadie Gould: Yes, "Peggy," I was there. It was called the theremin and was 

played by the hands coming in contact with electric currents. 
Peggy Bletzer. Absolutely correct. Here's one and right up your alley, Mary, 

Tell us what orchestra played at the Junior Party and who was the flash 

with the drums?" 

Mary Hayes: It was Bob Olive's Orchestra and George Gilligan was the flash 

with the drums! Boy! Was he in the groove! 
Peggy Bletzer: I thought you'd know that one, Mary. The next contestant is 

Nellie Howsberger. Nellie, your question is "In your opinion who were the 

mosi outstanding baseball players?" 
Nellie Howsberger: Freddie Slattery and "Hop" McKinnon were very good, 

and of course George Anderson did a fine job of pitching. 
Peggy Bletzer: Oh, naturally, Nell! Well, now for the last question. "Where did 

the Junior Class go on its outing?" This question goes to Minot Hollis, and I 

hope he left his skunks at home! 
Minot Hollis: Why, Peg, what ever made you say that? The Junior and Senior 

Classes took the boat to Provincetown. We danced on the boat and explored 

Provincetown when we reached there. 
Peggy Bletzer: That's fine. Minot. I will now turn the programme over to our 

announcer, W arren McKinnon who has a word for you! 
Hop McKinnon: You have been listening to the (pii/ Programme presented by 

the Junior Braodcasting Corporation through the facilities of station W. H. S- 

After a short pause the final quarter will begin. 
Production Managers: 

Harry Belcher Constance O'Neil 

Nellie Howsberger Barbara Stoneiy 



SENIOR CLASS HISTORY 



Sponsor of Senior Quarter. 

Announcer 

Quizmaster. 



Mr. Charles Thibadeau, Superintendent 

George Delorey, Class President 

John O'Connor 



George Delorey: Ladies and gentlemen, you are now listening to the last quarter 
of the most interesting quiz programme you have ever heard in your life. It's 
coming to you direct from W. H. S. Music Hall through the facilities of the 

Senior Broadcasting System. Yes, sir, that's right, that quiz programme sponsored 
by Mr. Charles Thibadeau, Superintendent of W. H. S. The question will be 
interrogated (ahem!) by that oF professor, you guessed it, John O'Connor. 
I can see by that glint in his eye that he has a fine batch of questions and 
several unsuspecting victims ready for to-day's show- And so without further 
ado, I give you John O'Connor. 

H 26 E3 



John O'Connor: Thank you, George. And a pleasant good day to all of you in 
our unseen audience. I see by our studio clock that it is 1941, so let's get the 
programme rolling. May I once again repeat that all winners receive absolutely 
free with the best wishes of W. H. S. a gilt-edged diploma suitable for showing 
your luture bosses. Our first contestant, Stella Parsons, steps bravely to the 
microphone. Stella, what important event happened on September 4, 1940? 

Siella Parsons: Why, that was the day that W. H. S. re-opened and we seniors 
Started on the last lap of our education at W. H. S. 

John O'Connor: That is correct, absolutely correct, Stella. And now for a little 
question on sports. For our next contestant we have no less a sports authority 
I ban Henry Burke, sports editor of the W. H. S. Reflector. "Doc," will you 
tell us a little about the W. H. S. football season of 1940? 

Henry Burke: Be glad to, John. The football team went undefeated in ten 
straight games and was crowned Class C State Champions. For their efforts, 
they were given a banquet and a trip to Washington, D. C. 

John O'Connor: Thank you, "Doc". You will get your diploma by R. F. D. I 
see that our next contestant is our musical expert, George Gilligan. George, 
what band was "in the groove" at the Victory Dance? 

George Gilligan: That's an easy one. The band was the "Merlinites," and inci- 
dently the affair was a big success. The money went into the Student Council 
fund. 

John O'Connor: Yes, sir, you called it, George. W. H. S. thanks you and gives 
you without cost or obligation our special, f mean of course your diploma. 
And here comes Ann Gardner to do her bit for good of W. H. S. Ann, why 
did all the seniors get prettied up on a certain Wednesday in January? 

Ann Gardner: Mmm! That must have been the day the seniors had their pic- 
tures taken individually down at W. H. S. hall. 

John O'Connor: That not only must have been, ft was, Ann. Here is our next 
contestant, Weymouth's all-American drum major, Marjorie Leonard- Margie, 
could you tell me at what event Mr. Brown was the main attraction? 

Marjorie Leonard: Could that by any chance have been the Seniors' Christmas 
Party? 

John O'Connor: It most certainly would, Margie, it most certainly could. My, 
what a talented group of contestants we have here tonight. Our next contest- 
ant coming up to the mike is that old master of sleight of hand, William 
Pierce. Bill, can you tell the audience who were some of the men who were 
invited to W. H. S. to entertain the students? 

Bill Pierce: If my memory serves me correctly, Bruce the Magician was here on 
December 9 and Mr. Willard of the Bentley School of Accounting gave a talk 
on March 10. 

John O'Connor: I see that your memory is in rare form, as your answer was 
absolutely correct. Now I see our golden-voiced tenor, William Sewell is 
approaching the mike. I'll not ask you to favor us with a selection, Bill, but 
instead can you tell me what took place on February 21? 

Bill Sewell: I'm sorry you have no time to hear me, I did so want to sing. How- 
ever, on the date that you mentioned, the Musical Revue was presented. 



John O'Connor: Sorry to interrupt, Bill. The show must go on. Your answer was 
100% correct; so you may expect your diploma on or about June 19. Our 
next contestant is our dance expert, Robert Walsh. "Pop", can you name a 
few of the dances held in the latter part of our senior year? 

Robert Walsh: Well, there was the Senior Prom. On April 18, and of course the 
Senior Reception on the night of Graduation. 

john O'Connor: Very good, "Pop", very good. And now for that brilliant answer 
I shall see that you, too, receive your diploma. Oops, I see by our studio clock 
that our time is drawing short; so I'll ask Cecil Breton if he will tell us any 
important happenings that the professor has forgotten. Cecil. 

Cecil Breton: Well, John, there's something that I wish I could forget, and that's 
the basketball season. It was ghastly. However, the Senior Play went over 
with a bang- Oh, yes, I think the last important doing of the class of '41 
was the senior outing. 

John O'Connor: Thank you very much, Cecil, and my sincere thanks to all you 
other contestants who made this quiz programme possible and who, incidentally, 
did a swell job in answering those questions. I now turn you over to our 
announcer. 

George Delorey: Well, folks, I guess that's all for this year. It's time to sign 
off now, but before doing so, I wish to express, in behalf of the student body 
of Weymouth High, our thanks and appreciation to the teaching faculty, 
school committee, and other persons who have made our years here most 
enjoyable. 

Production Staff: 

Harold Buker, Manager John O'Connor 

Stella Parsons 



n 28 n 



MID the bustle and confusion on the carnival grounds, a lone figure wan- 
dered aimlessly about. The harsh voices of the barkers, intermingling with the 
shrill music of the various amusements, confused the man until the sign, Madame 
Laronga, The Crystal Gazer, caught his eye. 

He entered the darkened tent. Inside sat Madame Laronga before a table, 
with her bewitching eyes looking into a large crystal ball before her. As he stood 
there, undecided, the gypsy motioned for him to sit down. Then, out of the 
misty depths appeared the faces of his classmates of the Class of '41, while the 
gypsy extended her bony fingers over the crystal ball. Between the mumbled 
words and the blurry visions which were becoming clearer, he distinguished the 
separate fate of each classmate. 



ELEANOR ABBOTT 

The reason for the large attendance at a 
local theatre has just been solved. The ticket 
collector is Eleanor. 

CARL AHLSTROM 

"Puffy" is now the chief water boy for the 
Chicago Bears' football team. 

MARY AIELLO 

Mary has been designing clothes for movie 
stars in Hollywood. She is very successful in her 
field of work. 

WINIFRED ALEXANDER 

"Wini" now owns her chain of well-known 
restaurants and keeps her patrons well -satisfied. 

ISMINNIE ANDRIAN 

"Minnie" is now a graduate nurse. She feeds 
her patients candy bars. 

MARY AUSTIN 

After completing her course at college, Mary 
has become a nurse and can be seen any time 
at the Weymouth Hospital. 

PHYLLIS BACON 

"Phil" is now back teaching senior Latin at 
good old Weymouth High. 

GEORGE BAILEY 

George has taken over his father's locksmith 
business, and is reputedly the finest locksmith 
in these here parts. 

ALPHONSE BAKISH 

Al is playing on an All-American Football 
Team known as the Bakish Bruisers. The team 
is composed of such stars as Delorey, Bates and 
other members of Weymouth's 1940 football 
team. 

GLADYS BARNES 

Gladys is now writing love stories for True 
Romances. 

AVIS BATCHELDER 

Avis can be seen any day as a typist in one 
of the large hospitals in Boston. 



BARBARA BATCHELDER 

"Babs" has started a "drawing" class at Wey- 
mouth High. She has a "style" all her own. 

ROBERT BATES 

Robert now teaches geometry, which was his 
favorite subject in Weymouth High School, in 
a large public school in Boston. 

THELMA BEALS 

"Teddie" is now .1 bathing beauty lounging 
on the sands of Miami Beach. She obtained 
the position while spending the winter there. 

HARRY BELCHER 

Harry has just recentl) performed at the 
Weymouth High School. He thrilled many of 
the children with his magical tricks. 

CAROL BENSON 

Carol now is head of a large chain of restau- 
rants. She gained experience in the Weymouth 
High lunch room. 

BI R I R \ M BICKFORD 

"Bick" is now star left guard for the Green 
Ba\ Packers professional football team. 

HERBERT BII .LINGS 

With the money he received from a rich 
uncle. Herbert leads a leisurel) and uneventful 
life. 

|(>H\ BISOGANANO 

John has taken over his father's barber shop. 
He likes the location, because it's near a 
theatre. 

|()S| |'H BISOGNANO 

"Joe'' has become a bigwig in the sporting 
world. He owns a hockey team, a baseball team, 
and a fine line of racing thoroughbreds. 

WALTER BLAIR 

Walter is chief instructor at a "swanky" rol- 
ler-skating rink. Remembering his own first few 
attempts, Walter specializes in helping beginners. 

JEANNE BLANCHARD 

Jeanne is now a very efficient employee in an 
insurance company in Boston. 



MARGARET BLETZER 

After completing a course in journalism. 
"Peg" is now on the staff of the Daily Globe. 
She just loves excitement, especially chasing 
"red" fire trucks. 

RICHARD BOSCHE 

"Dick" is a successful business man, and is 
seen every day on Wall Street, New York. 

MARY BOYLE 

Mary is now head dietitian at the Waldorf. 

ETHEL BOYNTON 

After Ethel completed her business training, 
she obtained a position in a small business firm 
in Xew York as a stenographer. 

BENJAMIN BRAVA 

"Benny" has just acquired ownership of his 
youthful idols, the Boston Bees. Incidentally, 
the Bees have just won their fifth pennant in a 
row. 

ETHEL BRENNAN 

Ethel has just become the Olympic Champi- 
on roller skater. She attributes her success to 
her early start at the Winter Garden. 

GERARD BRENNAN 

Gerard now plays hockey with the Boston 
Bruins. His position is goalie and he is con- 
sidered one of the best. 

JOHN BRENNAN 

At this time we see John just beginning his 
political career by being elected selectman in 
the Town of Weymouth. 

C ECIL BRETON 

Cecil is office boy in a Wall Street brokerage 
firm. He throws all old letters in the waste- 
paper basket with never-failing accuracy. I guess 
we all know where he acquired his skill. 

M \RY BRIGGS 

Man's earl) experience at Weymouth High 
made her so popular that she is now head cook 
for a Hollywood actor. 

VRNOLD BROW N 

Arnold is the coach of a local high-school 
football team. Next Saturday his team will pla\ 
the good old W. H. S. 

( \ I HERINE BUCHANAN 

"Kay" can be heard over the tadio almost any 
time as pianist in a leading band. 

HAROLD Bl KI R, JR. 

Harold has taken over his father's oil busi- 
ness. He plans to pass it on to his son in an- 
other generation. 

HENRY BL'RKE, JR. 

"Doc" is back at W. H. S. actually convincing 
students that chemistry problems can be solved. 



WALTER BURKE 

"Wally" holds an important position in the 
Fore River Shipbuilding Yard. Without his 
services, National Defence would be seriously 
impaired. 

RITA BLRKETT 

Rita was secretary to a large concern in Bos- 
ton, until she married the boss's son. 

LOUISE BURNS 

Louise, who took the driving course at Wey- 
mouth High School, has become a part of 
Jimmy Lynch 's Dare-Devil Show. 

EDWARD BYRNE 

"Eddy" is now professor of English at Oxford 
University. He always knew more about the 
English language than the English themselves. 

LYNTON CAMPBELL 

Lynton's pro-British feeling and his interest 
in foreign affairs have caused him to go to Eng- 
land as a foreign correspondent for a large 
American newspaper. 

GERALDINE CANNON 

"Gerry" is now a teacher at Weymouth High 
School. She is very popular with her pupils. 

SADIE CARROLL 

Sadie has secured a position in one of the 
olfices of our Town Hall as a secretary. 

CONSTANCE CARTER 

"Connie" is now a volunteer Red Cross 
Worker, and has been sent across to war-torn 
Europe to aid in sa\ing the wounded. 

i'Al LINK CHANCE 

"Polly" has won acclaim in the field of art. 
She is now illustrating Mademoiselle. 

FREDERICK CHASE 

Fred was always interested in the conservation 
of forests. He is now in charge of one of these 
large projects. 

EDNA CHISHOLM 

Edna is now wearing a white uniform, after 
graduating from the Quincy Hospital, and she 
certainl) gets along with her men patients. 

PA I RICIA CHURCH 

At last "Pat's" dreams have come true. Yes, 
she is the girl who poses for Chesterfields. 

HELEN CIPULLO 

Helen is now employed b) a large store as a 
t\pisi. 

PHILIP CLAIN 

"Phil" has finally located a job. He's head of 
the shovel-holding department for the W. P. A. 

I'HII. IP CLEMENT 

"Phil" has become a successful chemist in one 
of the largest research laboratories in the 
country. 



HUBERT CLEVELAND 

"Pete" has just opened a Super Service Gas 
Station. His partner is Bill Connell. We hear 
they are doing great. 

PRISCILLA COLE 

Priscilla, now married, is living in a little 
white house in Braintree. 

VIRGINIA COLLINS 

"Ginny" graduated from a secretarial school, 
and is working in W. H. S. office. She couldn't 
keep away from the school! 

VELMA COLLYER 

Velma is a clothes buyer for a large depart- 
ment store. Her taste is just as excellent as in 
the good old days. 

JEAN CONDON 

Jean now spends all her time at the movies, 
because she doesn't have her next day assign- 
ments to worry over. 

WILLIAM CONNELL 

Between quick lunches of milk and brownies 
"Bill" has found time to write a book for the 
benefit of future W. H. S. students. It is a 
best-seller entitled How to Avoid Getting 
Caught Roaming the Corridors. 

MURIEL CORMACK 

Muriel is now a math professor at a prom- 
inent university. She received her valuable 
training at W. H. S. 

LOIS COURTNEY 

Lois has skated her way to fame and is now 
travelling all over the country, giving lessons 
on how it is done. 



MARY COVENEY 

Mary is a nurse at a prominent hospital, and 
has her eyes out for a nice-looking doctor. 

HELEN CRAWFORD 

Helen is now a very efficient secretary in one 
of our local firms. She gained her experience 
working in the Junior High School office. 

LESLIE CRAWFORD 

"Les" is now President of the Crawford Super 
Radio Company. He invented a new type radio, 
and then built up a large business. 

HELEN CROMWELL 

Helen is now writing a dictionary as a rival to 
Webster. Her vocabularv was obtained at 
W. H. S. 

MARIE CROWLEY 

Marie, because of her excellent record in 
driving, has been appointed Safety Commis- 
sioner of Massachusetts. 

JANET CURRIER 

Janet is now modeling dolls' clothes for a 
prominent clothing store. Who could be better 
at this job than Janet? 



WILLIAM CURRIER 

"Bill" has just completed writing a book 
called How to Overcome Sleepiness. At least it 
gives him something to think about. 

MARY CURRY 

Mary has surprised us all. She went to Holly- 
wood for a two weeks' visit, and so thoroughly 
convinced the M-G-M Company they were run- 
ning the business wrong, that she is now head 
production manager and chief business direc- 
tor. No wonder there are no more B pictures 
at M-G-M. 

ROBERT DAHLSTROM 

"Dahlie" is now employed at the Fore River 
He hopes some day to become an executive now 
that he has nothing to do. 

ENRICO DANUBIO 

Enrico is one of the ace photographers at 
Purdy's Studio. 

WILLIAM DAVISON 

"Bill" is a clarinet player in the New York 
Philharmonic Orchestra. We hear he is very 

well-known. 

EVELYN DE COSTE 

After completing her course in beauty cul- 
ture, Evelyn is now running a smart salon in 
New York. 

GEORGE DELOREY 

George is now playing professional football, 
although he does come back to W. H. S. to give 
the football team a few pointers. 

JOHN DELOREY 

"Johnnie's" hair has turned snow white. In 
collaboration with Fred Chase he spent too 
many tedious hours trying to trisect an angle. 

MARY DELOREY 

Mary is pounding a comptometer in a well- 
known insurance office. I guess Miss Hackett's 
training helped her. 

ANTOINETTE DE TOMMASO 

"Tony" has started a successful beauty shop 
in East Weymouth. She has several old friends 
that come in and admire her hair. 

GEORGE DIERSCH 

George now holds down a high position in 
the U. S. Government Agricultural Extension 
service. He is doing a great job, I hear. 

RICHARD DIZER 

"Dick" is now the man in charge of many 
men. He is head warden at Sing Sing. 

LOUISE DOANE 

Louise is doing well as a designer of dressei 
for an important clothing concern. 

ELLEN DOLAN 

Ellen is supervisor in one of Boston's largest 
hospitals. She enjoys her work very much. 



MARGARET DONAHUE 

"Pes'" is now the new Dorothy Lamour. She 
also is in charge of the campaign for Wilkie. 

DONALD DRAKE 

"Don" has just taken Snuffy Smith's place as 
Yard Bird in the U. S. Army. 

ROBERT DRAKE 

"Boh" has established a one-man Escort Ser- 
vice. He enjoys himself immensely as escort 
manager and president of the concern. 

MYR 1LE DROWN 

Myrtle has just completed a course in normal 
school and is teaching in the school she attended 
before Weymouth High School. 

MALCOLM DUFFEE 

"Mai" is greatly enjoying himself as Federal 
inspector of airplanes. 

AURIE DUPLIN 

Having finished normal school, Aurie is teach- 
ing in a local grammar school. She sees to it 
that all the children get their lessons down 
"pat"'. 

RLTH DWYER 

Ruth is now a well-known fashion expert in 
New York. She designs all the latest clothes, 
and shows how they are worn. 

WALTER EASTTEY 

Walter has taken up "jitterbug" dancing as a 
profession. His classes are conducted in Alding- 
ton. He spends most of his time teaching his 
favorite pupil. 

ELIZABETH FAHEV 

"Bett\" is now a nurse in a large hospital in 
New York, with all the patients and doctors in 
love with her. 

EDNA FAY 

Edna is the world's fastest and most efficient 
typist. She gained her -experience at Weymouth 
High School. 

PHYLLIS FEIST 

Pin Mis is hack to We\ mouth High School in 
the role of drawing teacher. 

EDWIN FINLAY 

"Bud"* is now head guide at Vassar College. 
From all reports he is enjoying his position im- 
mensely. 

RICHARD I [SH 

" Dick" is employed at the Hanover Airport. 
He is a stunt (her. He always was good at tricks. 
We wish you luck, "Dick" and hope you don't 
crack up. 

ELIZABETH FISHER 

Elizabeth is now a telephone operator. She 
likes her occupation very well, as it keeps her 
busy. 



[AMES FISHER 

"Jimmy" has just Imisc-d putting together an 
automobile thai will outdo any on the road in 
speed, power and appearance, Incidently it runs 
without gas, oil, or any of those unnecessary 
things. 

MAR fORIE FISHER 

"Midge" is now a private secretary to a well- 
known lawyer. Hence she does everything ac- 
cording to law. 

CAROL FITCH 

Carol has a position as secretary to the New 
York, New Haven, and Hartford Railway, and 
gets a free trip each summer. 

JAMES FITZPATRICK 

"Jimmy" has just finished putting otgether an 
novel, The Difficulties of Bashful Men. 

JOHN FLYNN 

John has become the nation's Number One 
Golfer. The papers have just finished publish- 
ing his spectacular win in the §10,000 open. 

JESSE FRANCIS 

Jesse has joined the Marines and become one 
of the most expert marksmen among them. He 
attributes this to the duck-hunting expeditions 
he went on as a boy. 

ELEANOR FRENCH 

Eleanor spent four years at college, trying to 
decide upon her lifetime career. She finally 
chose collecting and selling musical instruments. 

LOIS FRENCH 

Lois has at last reached her ambition. She 
now owns a ranch of her own and a dozen 
horses. 

NANCY GAILUS 

Nancy now owns her own beauty shop. She 
slings mud on the faces of many of her old 
schools chums. 

ANN GARDNER 

Ann is a commercial artist for a leading 
magazine. She draws the pictures that von see 
on the cover. 

GLORIA GAROFALO 

Gloria is the head nurse in one of Boston's 
largest hospitals. 

VIRGINIA GARRITY 

Virginia has attained an important position. 
She is the private secretary to the head of a 
prominent law firm. 

EDNA GALLEY 

Edna is that sweet blond who bustles around 
in white, keeping all the patients cheerful at St. 
Luke's Hospital. 

ARMIRANDA GIACOBBE 

Nan is a nurse and very capable. Good luck! 



RAYMOND GIFFORD 

"Ray" is now owner of a large chain of gro- 
cery stores. He got his experience while work- 
ing in the A & P in Braintree. 

GEORGE GILLIGAN 

George now has his orchestra in Hollywood. 
It is featured in the next movie coming to 
Boston, called Play It Again, Maestro. 

RAYMOND GILLIS 

As we travel through New Hampshire's rich 
agricultural expanses, we find "Ray" at work in 
charge of one of the best and biggest farms 
there. 

KATHLEEN GILLMAN 

"Kay" is a private secretary to the vice-presi- 
dent of the Granite Trust Company. 

GEORGE GLOSTER 

George now plays the clarinet in his own 
band, which is nationally popular. He says 
that he owes his success to the W. H. S. Band, 
where he got his start. 

RICHARD GOODWIN 

"Dick" is now master-minding the F. B. I. 
He seems to be cleaning up all the crooks and 
soon won't have any business. 

HAROLD GORMAN, JR. 

Harold, one of the town's well-known politi- 
cians, is now running for senator so that he can 
help keep the country out of war. 

EDWARD GRANT 

"Eddie" Grant has acquired the coveted job of 
chauffeur for His Excellency, the Governor. 

AMERICO GRILLO 

"Mickey" is the head of a large business con- 
cern, where he sits in a big chair and does 
nothing. 

DENNIS GRISDALE 

"Den" is a medical practitioner, and is most 
successful. 



ROBERT GROVES 

"Bob" has won the New England Model Air- 
plane championship with his new Cornel. 

BEATRICE HAAS 

Beatrice is now employed as a stenographer 
for Brown & Company. And it is a full-time job. 

ETHEL HAMILTON 

Ethel has now opened up a driving school for 
women. She is contented now, as there is never 
a dull moment in her work. 

RITA HANIAN 

Rita is employed as secretary in a leading con- 
cern in Boston. 

FRANCIS HANIFAN 

"Franny" is a foreman down at the yard now. 



ALICE HANSEN 
Alice is a model now, and her specialty is 

bright red knee socks. 



LOUISA HARDELL 

Being dietitian for a school is Louisa's pro- 
fession. And she never has corn beef hash on 
the menu. 



ARTHUR HARPER 

\ in who was graduated from West Point, 
is now stationed in Alaska. 



SHIRLEY HART 

Shirley, continuing to play the piano, has 
perfected the art, and is now working on a 
composition known as "Hartsky's Melody in 
A Hat. 



MARJORIE HARTFORD 

"Margie" is now teaching school back at Wey- 
mouth High School. 



M \ RY HAYES 

"Haysie" runs a feminine escort service thai 
is revolutionizing society. She thinks the women 
khould foot the bill. 



SHIRLEY HAZLETT 

Shirley is now a designer of antique jewelry. 
She tries out the effects on all her friends. 



CH \RLES HEARN 

"Bud" now own his own soda fountain, but 
it is rumored that he still eats up all the profits. 

PHYLLIS HEBERT 

Phyllis is district nurse for Weymouth this 

year. How goes it? 



FRANCIS HEGER 

"Iran'' is now one of the country's foremost 
pi lots. ;md is planning a transcontinental hop 
in one of his many planes. 

BETTY HILL 

"Betty" has just finished her latest book called 
What to do at Parties. The information should 
be good, if "Bettv" wrote it. 



|OH\ HOFFMAN 

John now has his band broadcasting over a 
nation-wide hook-up. However, now and then 
he drops in at Pond Plain to give the up and 
coming generation of "rugcutters" a break. 

HELEN HOLBROOK 

Helen is a stenographer now. 



ROBERT HOLBROOK 

"Bob is now playing first trumpet in Harry 
James's orchestra. He also composes. 



VIRGINIA HOPE 

Virginia is busily engaged in an office at Fore 
River. She says it's to be near her— father. 



ELEANOR HOPF 

Eleanor is now a "woman in white". She 
spends her time bringing cheer and medicine 
to her patients, especially the handsome males. 



WILLIAM HOWE 

"Bill' is now testing planes for the Navy, 
and in his spare time he designs them. 



NELLIE HOWSBERGER 

"Nell" is now a member of the white parade. 
However, this does not keep her away from 
Winter Carnivals and local dances. 



FRANCES HUNT 

"Frannie" is now back at Weymouth High, 
teaching stenographv. 



MARGARET HUNT 

Margaret is now chief librarian at the Boston 
Public Library. 



ROSEMARY HI RD 

Rosemary is being billed at the Boston Gar- 
den as Rosemary the Rollicking Rover on Roll- 
ers. She got all her training in Weymouth on 
the sidewalk*. 



IEANETTE IRELAND 

Jeannette has won great fame by publishing 
her poems. She gained experience by contribut- 
ing to the Reflector. 



THERESA JEWELL 

Theresa is now a private secretarv in a large 
firm in town, and her boss certainly is satisfied. 



HELEN K. EARNS 

Helen has become a graduate nurse, and is 
interested in her patients and the internes. 



RITA KEEFE 

Rita has made good as a costume designer. 
She is now designing clothes for Alice Faye, 
Jndv Garland, and many other famous actresses 
in Hollywood. 



GARRETT KEEGAN 

The great professor who just dug up that 
famous mummy down in Egypt is none other 
than our own Garrett. 



MARY K.EOHAN 

Mary is now editor of the newest publication 
H<ne to be Quiet. She ought to succeed. 



PAUL KEOHAN 

Paul, the great motion-picture producer, has 
finished his latest picture which has, as a set- 
ting, his "Home Town". 

RUBY KILLAM 

Ruby now plays the position of catcher on 
the Boston Olympetts Baseball team. 

RUTH KILLAM 

Ruth is now head nurse in a big hospital. 

PRISCILLA KUNZ 

"Pussy" has become an "angel of mercy". 
She has taken up Occupational Therapy to 
help invalids and cripples along the road to a 
useful life. 

JOHN LA ROCCO 

John has recently turned to professional golf. 
He holds many amateur titles from his younger 
days. 

CLARA LAROSSA 

Clara is private secretary to the President of 
Jones's Department Store. 

LARS LARSSON 

Lars is now a cartoonist for the Esquire maga- 
zine. 

CHRISTINE LAWTON 

Christine is now a stewardess on a Pan 
American clipper. 

AGNES LEAHY 

"Aggie" is now a stenographer in one of our 
large insurance companies. 

WILLIAM LEARY 

"Willie" is using his Latin skill to advantage. 
He "habeas corpuses" all day to his heart's con- 
tent, as he is a lawyer. 

DOROTHEA LEEMING 

"Dot" is a capable little business woman, 
who runs her own establishment. Her product 
must be good, 'cause the salesmen keep coming 
back for more. 

LEONARD LEINONEN 

Leonard became captain of Boeing's strato- 
liner fleet last week. 

MARJORIE LEONARD 

"Marjie" is strong woman in Ringling Bros.- 
Barnum & Bailey circus. She developed her 
muscles while twirling two batons as W. H. S. 
head drum major. And— oh, her weight-lifting 
partner! 

MARGARET LESENECHAL 

"Marg" is now a medical secretarv. After grad- 
uating from W. H. S. Margaret took some hard 
entrance exams to Simmons College, and— 
passed 'em. 



an 



M \RJORIE LESTER 

"Marjie" doesn't mind sitting all day in the 
cashier's cage at the Waldorf-Astoria. In the 
first place, she can gaze at the manager, an old 
friend, without being noticed. In the second, 
she got used to sitting while staying for Miss 
Wilson in 218. 

ALICE LEVANGIA 

Those tinkling laughs you hear from the lips 
of glamorous stars on the screen, are really 
Alice, exercising the experience she got, laugh- 
ing in 218. 

DONALD LIBBY 

"Lib" is now considered the greatest inventor 
of the age. He has developed a tireless, flame- 
less, and heatless match. 

JOSEPH LIVA 

"Joe" is now a very helpful instructor at the 
Winter Garden roller skating rink. 

DAVID LOVELL 

"Dave" now is a contractor, and has taken 
over her father's job. If you need a house built, 
call on "Dave." 

EDWARD LUCAS 

"Ed" is now an executive in a Boston bank. 
He has one of the best banks in Boston. 

ALEX LUCIANO 

Alex has become a second Lucky Teter, and 
is currently driving his racer in the Boston 
Garden. 



GEORGE LYMBURN 

George drifted into W. H. S. in 19.40 and like- 
wise into several feminine hearts. That ex- 
plains the popularity of the former Quincy boy 
on the screen, at present, 



CLARA LYSAKOWSKI 

Clara is now working in night school teaching 
stenog. Wonder how she likes it? 



PEARL MacALLISTER 

Pearl is now a private secretary in Boston, 
in one of our leading stores. 



MARY MacDONALD 

"Billie" has recently written The Boo Choo 
Jive, a new kind of dance melody that is 
sweeping the country. 



PHYLLIS MacDONALD 

"Phil" is a pretty graduate nurse who keeps 
her patients happy by holding their hands and 
smiling at them. 



WILLIAM MacDONALD 

"Bill" can be seen any day in the cab of the 
train between the Boston and Weymouth run. 



DOROTHEA MacDOUGALL 

"Dot" is now studying architecture. She spe- 
cializes in model homes. 

s MacLEOD 
Angus is an assistant chief at Fore River now. 

PATRICIA MADDOX 

"Pat" is not over the bud stage, and she is 
now a bloomin' good housewife. 

GEORGE MAHON'EY 

George became vice-president of the Curtiss- 
Wrighl Corporation last fall. 

R.OBER1 MAHONEY 

"Doc" is thai popular clerk at the First 
National around whom all the girls swarm. 
Can you blame 'em? 

UUCK M \HO\l Y 

Ulick is now writing out long grocery lists at 
the A & P Stop and Shop instead of "I will 
not chew gum' any more," or "I will not be 
a naughty boy", for Miss Wilson. 

\l VRJORIE MAJOR 

()u 1 own dear "Margie" has her own kinder- 
garten in East Weymouth, where she is kepi 
lms\ entertaining the children. 

WILLIAM MARDEN 

That rootin', toolin', shootin' Cowboy Jow, 
whose pleasing guitar solos are heard every day 
over the radio, is none other than "Bill" him- 
self. 

(CATHERINE McALEER 

"Kay" has been touring the Atlantic scacoast, 
giving sports enthusiasts lessons on sailing boats, 
"as the) should be sailed." Who would know 
better than "Kay" how this should be done? 

FRANCIS McCUE 

Francis is now chief editor of the Boston 
Globe. Remember when "Red" used to deliver 
papers? Now he prints them. 

GLADYS McCUE 

"Gladie" is now head floor walker in Kresge's 
in Boston. 

SHIRLEY McDERMOTT 

Shirley has just won the national jitterbug 
contest in Madison Square Garden. 

KATHLEEN McGLYNN 

"Kay" is secretary to an elderly woman. At 
this time they are touring the country. 

PRISCILLA McINTIRE 

"Cilia" has at last realized her ambition. She 
is a hostess on the Vaughn Clipper, which 
travels all over the world. 

JOHN McKINNEY, JR. 

John has received a job with a programme 
that has "Eat Williams' Wittles for Vitamins" 
as a motto. 



WARREN McKINNON 

Warren is in his glory now he has signed a 
contract to coach Notre Dame in football and 
baseball for the next three years. "Hop", as he 
is known, just coached an undefeated team. 

KATHLEEN McLAUGHLIN 

"Kay" has at last reached her ambition. She 
is now the head of an institution. 

ANNA McNALLY 

Anna has attained her life-long ambition. 
She is head dietitian at the Weymouth Hospital. 

WILLIAM McNULTV, JR. 

"Bill" has just broken into professional hockey 
as right wing for the Boston Bruins, and we 
understand he was voted the most outstanding 
rookie of the year. 

WILLIAM MEARA, JR. 

"Bill" has just inherited an insurance agency. 
His specialty is proving that automobile acci- 
dents are the other fellow's fault. 

DAVID MILLER 

David Miller has returned to Weymouth 
High, to attempt to fill Mr. Loud's shoes. 

GEORGE MILLER 

George has just graduated from Lincoln Law 
School and he has received a position in Wey- 
mouth High teaching Commercial Law. 

OLGA MILLIGAN 

Olga has just become nationally famous. She 
has discovered how to make doughnuts with- 
out holes. 

DOROTHY MILNER 

"Dot" travels around now and writes books 
on the social conditions of the country. 

FLORENCE MINASIAN 

Did you notice the wonderful cooking in the 
W. H. S. lunchroom? Give the praise to Flor- 
ence, because she is the chief cook. 

HELEN MITCHELL 

Helen is vice-president of a professional hock- 
ey team. We understand that her husband is 
the star player of the team and also the presi- 
dent. 

RUTH MITCHELL 

"Ruthie" is on the radio programme called 
"Your Giggle and How to Perfect It." She is 
considered an authority on the subject. 

MARGARET MORRILL 

Margaret is private secretary to a big execu- 
tive in Washington. Her training at W. H. S. 
comes in handy. 

ELOISE MORRISON 

Eloise has a job modeling for a large firm in 
New York. You can always see her picture in 
the large magazines. You will recognize her, as 
she is always smiling. 



MARTHA MORRISON 

Martha is now a nurse. Her cheery disposi- 
tion brings many a patient back to health. 

MARY MOTTOLA 

Mary is still on the go; she is now a travelling 
saleswoman, travelling and hurrying all day 
long. 

ROY MUNROE 

Roy now has his own office in the City Hall. 
Roy is chief accountant for the city of Boston, 
and he is certainly paying a big income tax now. 

JESSIE MURRAY 

"Jess" is end girl in the chorus of Rockettes 
at Rockefeller Centre. Remember how she 
danced at the Senior Christmas Party? 

FRIEDA NAEGELE 

Frieda is the owner of an exclusive dress shop 
in Boston. 

EDITH NERGER 

Edith is librarian of the Tufts Library in 
We\ mouth Landing. 

EVELYN NICHOLS 

Evelyn is the perfect secretary. She has a pleas- 
ant smile for everyone who enters the office of 
Win. Filene and Sons. 

MARILYN NICKERSON 

Marilyn Nickerson is still a horse lover, and 
has now started her own riding school. 

DOMINICK NISTA 

"Dom" is making big money now, playing pro- 
fessional football for the Chicago Bears. "Dom" 
hopes to get a coaching job when he retires 
from the gridiron. 

JOHN NOLAN 

John is a salesman for a women's cosmetics 
firm in Chicago. John never gets tired of his 
job, because he has 500 beautiful models work- 
ing for him. 

RICHARD NORWOOD 

"Dick" is now settled in a quiet home some- 
where on the Cape, where he is finishing his 
best and latest novel, Dickie Dare Dares and 
Does. 

ELIZABETH O'BRIEN 

"Betty" is another perfect little housewife. 
Every week she is entertaining some of her 
former classmates. 

DORIS O'CONNOR 

Doris has just successfully passed the bar and 
she is now well on her way to become one of 
the few famous women lawyers. 

JOHN O'CONNOR 

John is no longer called "Cooker," but Pro- 
fessor O'Connor of Holv Cross. 



CONSTANCE O'NEIL 

"Connie", after completing her course in 
surgery, has graduated with many honors. She 
is now an assistant to the head surgeon of Chi- 
cago. 

MARGARET O'NEIL 

"Marjie" has obtained the position of head 
hostess on a Pan-American Airline's Flag Ship. 

HELEN PAIGE 

Helen is now private secretary for Schultz 
and Son in Boston. In a few years she may be 

vice-president. 

JAMES PANETTA, JR. 

"Jim" is learning the coal business from the 
bottom up. He's shovelling it with the same 
swing he used passing that pigskin from centre. 

ROBERT PANORA 

"Bob" has passed his Civil Service exam, for 
police work. His score was par excellence. 

ARTHUR PARNABY 

Arthur has worked his way up from an ap- 
prentice to general supervisor at Fore River 
shipyard, and we understand that everything 
is running perfectly. 

STELLA PARSONS 

Stella has her own dance studio in New York. 
We have heard that she also teaches piano for 
a sideline. 

MALCOLM PARTRIDGE, JR. 

Malcolm has won the national airplane con- 
test, and is now working on a new model. 

LINCOLN PASSERO 

Lincoln is now owner of that famous Night 
Club, the High Hat. 

BRADFORD PATTERSON 

"Pat" is a famous eye specialist. He entered 
the profession alter being bothered with dots 
before his eyes in W. H. S. 

DANA PEASLEE 

Dana has accepted a contract with M-G-M 
studios. He has all the Weymouth High girls 
"rooting" for him. They like his manner of 
dress and his personality. 

DOROTHY PERKINS 

"Dot" is being acclaimed the world's most 
fashionable dress designer. 

FRANCES PERKINS 

Frances is the attractive young nurse you 
have heard so much about. She has Joe as a 
frequent patient. 

CAROLINE PETERS 

"Carol" just couldn't give up dancing. She 
has now taken over where Maude Hunt left off. 
The lucky pupilsl 

HOWARD PETERSON 

"Howie" has become a flying instructor at 
Randolph Field, Texas, after he himself com- 
pleted the course there. 



VICTOR PETERSON 

"Pete" has now graduated form M. I. T., 
where he received a degree in that complicated 
subject of math. He is contemplating an offer 
from W. H. S. to come back and teach math 
along with Mr. Stewart. 

WILLIAM PIERCE 

"Bill", famous for his grace and ease, is now 
teaching dancing to the younger generation. 

[RENE PILLSBLRY 

Irene is now a professor at Vassal. She teach- 
es English and loves it. 

LAWRENCE P1NGREE 

Lawrence has now taken over his father's 
radio business, which he has built up until he 
has now the largest radio shop in this part of 
Massachusetts. 

EILEEN PITTS 

Eileen works as a waitress in Keane's Res- 
taurant in Kockland. She is always certain of 
one tip each night. 

LUCILLE PLOURDE 

Lucille can be seen behind a counter in 
Filene's, selling men's apparel. Business picked 
up in a great hurry. 

ROBERT PLOURDE 

"Bob" has just completed his course in college. 
He is now a certified public accountant, 

PAUL QUINLAN 

Paul is now beating out the rhythm for his 
own orchestra. They will soon play at the 
Quint) Armor) for one night. 

ROBERT RAND 

When you see someone walking along, care- 
free, and happy )ou'll know it's "Bob", who 
didn't let anything bother him at W. H. S. 
either. 

ROBERI RAYMOND 

"Boli" is now on the radio with his own 
band, taking the place of Harry James. 

GEORGE REED, JR. 

"Junie" can be seen anytime, winging his 
way over the country as a transcontinental pilot. 

AGNES REID 

Agnes has made a success of hei Reid Secre- 
tarial School for Girls. 

BERNARD REILLY 

Bernard has recently finished his college 
training and has been "drafted" by the Chicago 
Bears to play football at $37,000 yearly. 

CAROL ROBERTS 

Carol is that girl you see so much modelling 
clothes at the New York Style Show. 

ELLSWORTH ROBSON 

"Robie" is now an architect with "Stoop" 
Sargent. Both boys are doing a swell business. 



EJ3 8 D 



GERALD ROGERS 

"Jerry", the great violinist, upon breaking 
his fiddle at the Opera House while giving a 
performance, took out his jew's-harp and played 
the American ditty. Roll out the Barrel. 

HUBERT RUEL 

"Skee" is teaching the polka to all his old class- 
mates at the popular dance palisade, "Pond 
Plain." 

ROBERT SARGENT 

"Stoop" now is a well known architect. He 
got his experience by drawing down in Mr. 
Parker's room. 

NORMAN SCOTT 

"Norm" is headmaster at Scott's School of 
Swing. You will recognize his lively little sec- 
retary as a former W. H. S. cheerleader. 

WILFRED SEVIGNY, JR. 

At sixty years of age Wilfred has just bought 
Narragansett Race track which was his life long 
ambition. 

WILLIAM SEWELL 

"Bill" has long ago given up his tormenting 
trumpet, and now sings his neighbors to sleep 
in a lilting tenor. 

HOWARD SHAW 

"Howie" has bought the Packard Automo- 
bile Company since he left W. H. S. Because 
of his experience with them, he knows just 
what's wrong with them and why. 

MARY SHAWLES 

Mary is a social worker keeping up the good 
work of helping everybody. 

RUTH SHEEHY 

Whenever you don't feel well, just go to 
Ruth, who is now a competent graduate nurse. 

ROBERTA SILVA 

Roberta just couldn't leave dear old W. H. S. 
and is back here as our dietitian down in the 
cafeteria. 

JOHN SLOANE 

John, through a large inheritance, is now a 
Wall Street gentleman. Some people have all 
the luck. 

RALPH STAPLES 

Ralph's Hill Billy orchestra has become so 
famous that it is now on a coast to coast net- 
work. 

HERBERT STARR 

"Herb" is raising all kinds of farm products. 
P. S. He has also a large family. 

SYLVIA STEELE 

Sylvia is now editor of one of the leading 
newspapers of the country. 



JEANNETTE STONE 

The pretty secretary for Pierce's Lumber 
Company is only Jeannette, who is practically a 
partner in the business. 

BARBARA STONELY 

"Barbie" has turned out to be a physics teach- 
er. What fun she used to have in the lab. at 
W. H. S.l 

RUTH STUB 

"Ruthie" has recently become Junior Partner 
of a new concern called Authors, Inc. Everybody 
will recognize her Senior Associate. 

KENNETH SWAN, Jr. 

"Kennie" is now kept busy shining up his new 
Cadillac, which was always his ambition to have. 

ELIZABETH SWEENEY 

"Bettie", having completed her training as a 
nurse, has been appointed Superintendent of 
nurses at the Sullivan Hospital. 

SHIRLEY SYLVESTER 

Shirley, a fine business woman, now owns her 
own dress shop. 

MURIEL SYME 

Muriel Syme has started a home bakery. She 
doesn't kneed any dough. 

JOHN TANGUY 

John is a true "Man about Town." Yes, he 
is working as a U. S. letter carrier. 

BERYL THOMAS 

That efficient girl in a well-known office is 
none othei than Beryl, who received her train- 
ing at W. H. S. 

DOROTHY THOMAS 

"Dotty" is now writing a book entitled Skip- 
ping School Without Getting Caught. Who 
could know better? 

THOMAS THOMPSON 

Thomas has taken over his father's chicken 
business He has gone in for it in a big way and 
has fifteen men working for him. 

THYRA THORNBERG 

Thvra, after graduating from business school, 
has become her own boss. She can now type 
just as fast as she pleases. 

MARILYN TITUS 

Marilyn is now a capable stenographer in a 
department store. 

WILLIAM TORMEY 

"Bill' is a commissioned officer in the U. S. 
Navy. 

MARJORIE TORREY 

One of Wevmouth's best telephone operators 
is "Margie." She got her practice talking at 
W. H. S. 



□ □ 



JOHN TOWER 

John of former all-American fame has settled 
down as head coach of one of the country's 
leading schools. 

MARJORIE TRAFTON 

Marjorie is now a secretary to a boss in a 
local concern. I wonder who he can be? 

MARY TURNER 

Mary is teaching grammar school now, and 
every morning there are at least three red apples 
and one bunch of flowers on her desk. 

NORMA TURNER 

"Norm" is now the special nurse hired by all 
doctors to lake care of their sons. They all want 
to marry her but she prefers one. 

MARY TWOMEY 

Mary is a dramatic instructor in a Girls' School 
in France. She learned to speak Freach fluently 
in the French Club and in its play at W. H. S. 

PAULINE VENTRE 

Pauline is a proprietor of Pauline's Pastry 
Pantry and serves the most deelicious food. I 
guess she profited from being refreshment chair- 
man of the Junior Monday Club. 

FRANCIS VINCENT 

"Vin" has received great recognition as a 
lawyer; as lawyer for the defendant in the recent 
"love" killing he proved his client not guilty. 

ROBERT WALSH 

Robert Walsh, better known as "Pop", has 
become the successor of the talented Bud Fisher. 
Mutt and Jell are even funnier now. 

KIRBY WEATHERSBY 

After all Kirby's experience in the W. H. S. 
band, he has just obtained the job of drummer 
boy in the army. 

DOROTHY WELLS 

"Dot" has become famous in the literary 
world, for she has published a volume of poems. 

MARJORIE WILKIE 

"Marjie" has now graduated from Bridge- 
water State Teachers' College and is back 
teaching in W. H. S. She just couldn't give up 
the place! 

ELLA WINTERMEYER 

Ella is a popular writer of the day. She has 
recently had her first book, My Dreams, pub- 
lished. 

MARGARET WOLFE 

"Daisy" is now the ideal secretary. I shouldn't 
wonder if she would marry the boss any day 
now. The company is Marani Electric Razors. 

MELBA WOOD 

Why, it's none other than our own Melba who 
is running the ever-growing How to Overcome 
Shyness Club! 



GERTRUDE WOODIS 

"Gert" is dow none other than America's No. l 
Roller Skate Queen. She also teachers roller 
skating at Winter Gardens. 

JAMES WOOTEN 

James is head manager of the Chicago Bears 
during the loot ball season, and is the proprietor 
of a chain ol roadstands in the summer. 



MERLE WORKMAN 

Merle graduated from Bridgewater, and is 
back at W. H. S. teaching her favorite subject- 
Latin. 



[RENE WYSOCKI 

Irene is a head nurse in a hospital. Her cheery 
hellos have made her a second Florence Night- 
ingale to the patients. 

ANTHONY YANNIZZI 

"Tony or "Butch" is now speaking in behalf 
of the labor class. He is demanding a tWO-houi 
day and higher wages. What is the world com- 
ing to? 

EUGENE YOUNG 

After many years of patient study, "Eli" has 
secured a position as a violinist in the National 
Philharmonic Orchestra. 



JOSEPH ZEOLII 

"Joe" has just accepted a job as bus driver 
for the Lovell Lines. We wonder if he learned 
to drive from the Safety Driving Course. 



Trade School 



FRANK BARCELLOS 

Frank is a famous pilot, flying passengers for 
ihc American Airlines. 



\R I 111 K BARNES 

"Artie" is now selling hot dogs at the White 
Tower Cafe. He got his experience from trying 
to sell his Spitz puppies back in '40. 

PARKER BATES 

Parker's name is in the headlines so much 
that everybody knows he is the unanimous 
choice for the all-American football team. 



WILTON BATES 

"Willy" is now out in Hollywood. He's Clark 
Gable's chief competitor. 



WALLACE BABIN 

"Wally" is now editor of the Boston Globe. 
He started in as a paper boy at Weymouth 
Landing. 



□4°n 



ROBERT BLAISDELL 

"Bob" is working on a farm in Maine, trying 
10 raise a new type of potato. 

HARRY BLAKEMAN, JR. 

Harry, ever the musician, composes light 
opera and plays the banjo for a New York night 
club. 



HENRY BR EN NOCK 

Heni\ is now owner of a large lobster com- 
pany down at Cohasset. 

I DWARD COBBETT. JR. 

"Eddie" is now head mechanic at the Lovell 
Bus Garage. He's trying to rid the buses of 
theii rattles. 

HARRY CRONIN 

Harry the wood-butcher is still in the trade. 
He's boss of a lumbering camp. 

( H \RLES CULLIVAN 

"Charlie" is a great roller skater. He owes 
this achievement to so much night practice at 
the Winter Garden Rollerway. 

JOHN DAYIDSON, JR. 

"Johnny" is now the middle-weight champion 
of the state. He got his experience at the Clapp 
Memorial. 

PETER DUNG\N, JR. 

"Pete" is still working in Norwell, plucking 
liens to the tune of "Whistle While You Work". 

ROBERT DUNCAN 

"Bob" finds it hard to shave twice a day; so 
he joined the House of David. 

WILLIAM ELLIS 

"Bill", having acquired a V-8, is now travel- 
ling salesman for a printers' supplies concern. 
He travels from one end of the country to the 
other, telling the same old story. 

WILLIAM FADER 

"Bill", being a ladies' man, now runs a matri- 
monial bureau for his friends, and publishes 
Matrimonial News. 

DANIEL FLAVELL 

"Deacon" used to drive other boys and girls 
to school in the morning while going to W. V. S. 
From this practice he capitalized and organized 
a large taxi concern. 

COLIN GILLIS 

"Gill" is a member of the Olympic track 
team. He acquired his experience in running 
for the Hingham bus after football practice. 

DONALD GREEN 

"Mayor", because of his great ambition, has 
been elected first mayor of the City of Wey- 
mouth. 



EDWARD HART, JR. 

"Ed" spent most ol his time sleeping in school. 
He now tests products for the American Mat- 
tress Company. 



DENNIS HI RLIHY, JR. 

"Denny" is a very good sheet metal worker. 
He owns ;i shop, and employs twenty-five men. 



FRANK. HILTON 

"Sag" is now chief engineer at Henry Ford's 
Somerville Plant. He acquired his experience 
from having a junk yard in his own back yard. 



DANIEL KEEGAN, JR. 

"Danny", who has continued the reading of 
detective story thrillers, has at last discovered a 
way to get some of his homework in on time 
now that he has none to do. 



EDMUND KELLY 

"Eddie", having had a great deal of experi- 
ence in buying pocketbooks for ladies, now buys 
I hem foi a large department store in Boston. 



JOHN MACONOCHIE, JR. 

When "Jiggs" wasn't at home with indiges- 
tion, he was in school "beefing" about something. 
He now is the proud owner of a large beef 
products concern. 



GEORGE MAYNE 

George belongs to the Siwash Debating Club. 
The arguments with his teachers served as a 
training programme for the position he now 
holds. 



LOUIS McIVER 

"Louie" is District Manager of twenty three 
First National Stores. He started in as order 
boy. 



LEONARD NADELL 

"Lenny" is the manager of the Boston Red 
Sox. He acquired his experience by managing 
the W. V. S. basketball team. 



WARREN PEARSON 

"Zeke" played in the High School band while 
in school. He now is chief trombone player in 
Glenn Miller's orchestra. 



WILLIAM PIZZI 

"Bill" was a great Grunt and Groan artist 
while in the trade school. Now he is heavy- 
weighl champion of the world— another "Angel." 



ROBERT REED 

"Ezra" is recognized as the best Model-T 
Ford repairman in the State of Maine. 



DONALD SCHULTZ 

"Don" is now a great competitor of Charles 
Atlas, the world's strongest and best-built man. 

WALTER SHURTLEFF 

"VVally" has just opened his new automobile 
paint shop down in the prosperous town of 
Rockland. 

NORMAN STEVENSON 

"Steve" has at last reached the height of his 
ambition. He is manager of the Granite City 
Print. 



CLASS 



CECIL BRETON 
MARJORIE FISHER 
MARJORIE MAJOR 
PATRICIA MADDOX 
GEORGE MAHONEY 
ELEANOR HOPF 
VIRGINIA COLLINS 
RUTH DWYER 
MARY TWOMEY 
VIRGINIA GARRITY 
HENRY BURKE 



PIERCE TATREAU 

"Pie" found it \ery hard to keep out of his 
lunch before the lunch period. He now own a 
restaurant where he can eat to his heart's con- 
tent. 

ELD ON TUTTLE 

"Dunny" is ;i great hockey player for the 
Boston Bruins. He owes this to his practice in 
youngei years. 

JAMES V VNASSE 

"Spit' was forever fighting while attending 
W. V. S. He now is married and still fighting. 



PROPHECY COMMITTEE 

James Panetta, Chairman 

MARY CURRY 
WALTER BLAIR 
RUTH KILLAM 
JEAN CONDON 
RICHARD GRISDALI 
WILLI \M MI.ARA 
SHIRLEY McDERMOTT 
BRADFORD PATTERSON 
WILLIAM ELLIS, T. S. 
ELDON TUTTLE, T. S. 
ROBERT REED, T. S. 



a a 



Most Popular Girl Katherine McAleer 

Most Popular Boy Warren McKinnon 

Wittiest Henry Burke 

Prettiest Rita Keefe 

Athlete , George Delorey 

Class Comedian George Lymburn 

Class Bookworm Fred Chase 

Class Musician George Gilligan 

Class Baby Kirby Weathersby 

Class Actor Edward Byrne 

Class Actress Elizabeth Fahey 

Class Heartbreaker George Bailey 

Most Dependable Sylvia Steele 

Most Carefree Edwin Einlay 

Best Dressed Girl Margaret Donahue 

Best Dressed Boy John Nolan 

Most Popular With The Ladies George Bailey 

Most Popular With The Men Margaret Bletzer 

Class Shiek George Lymburn 

Woman Hater James Woolen 

Class Poet Dorothy Wells 

Class Artist Ann Gar drier 



□ 44Q 



ELEANOR ABBOTT 

Weymouth Landing "El" 
Business Course 

Band 1, 2; Glee Club 2; Gregg Transcription 
Certificate for 80 words a minute; Gregg Tran- 
scription Certificate for 100 words a minute; 
Class Outing Committee 4. 

It's nice to be natural when you are nat- 
urally nice. 



PHYLLIS BACON 

Weymouth Landing "Phyll" 
Classical Course 

Home Room Club 2; Home Room Spelling Bee 

Champion 2.. 

Her friends, many; 
Her foes, not any. 



CARL AHLSTROM 

Weymouth Heights "Puffy" 
General Course 

St. Andrew's School 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 2, 3; Junior 
Prom Committee 3; Baseball 2, 3; Basketball i, 
2, 3; Football 1, 2, 3; Hill Billy Band 1, 2, 3; 
Weymouth High School 4; Senior Prom Com- 
mittee 4; Football 4; Indoor Track 4. 

"A little nonsense now and then 
Is relished by the best of men." 



MARY AIELLO 
East Weymouth 
Business Course 

Usher at Senior Play 4. 



"May' 



Her quick changes from quietness to hilarity 
us guessing. 



GEORGE BAILEY 
Weymouth Landing 
General Course 

Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 3, Manager I, 2; 
["rack 1, 3; Hocke\ 4; French Club 3; Student 
Council 1. 2: Home Room Club 2; Junior Ush- 
er; [unior Prom Committee. 

"Romeo, where art thou?" 
You nevei can be found. 



ALPHONSE BAKISH 

East Weymouth "Al" 
Classical Course 

Freshman Champion of Boston Herald Spell- 
ing Bee 1; Student Council Nice-President 2, 
3. |; Junior Decorating Committee 3; Class 
Nominating Committee 4; Senior Prom Com- 
mittee Chairman \; Football 2, 3, 4; Lunch- 
room l)ut\ 2. 3. |. 

"The greater man, the greater courtesy." 



WINIFRED ALEXANDER 

North Weymouth "Wini" 
General Course 

Class Clothing Committee 4. 

There is a place for everything, 

And school is the place for thinking. 



GLADYS BARNES 

South Weymouth "Claddie" "Harney" 
Business < <>m se 

Glee Club t, 2: Home Room Club 2; Class 
Motto Committee |; |-H Club President 1, 2. 

A laughing eye, a merry smile, 
Tend to make a girl worth while. 



ISMINNIE ANDRIAN 

South Weymouth "Minnie" 
Business Course 

Rockport High School 1; Memorial High School, 
Roxbury 2; Jeremiah Burke High School, Dor- 
chester 3; Weymouth High School 4. 

Though she is new, 

She's a friend, good and true. 



MARY AUSTIN 
South Weymouth 
Classical Course 

Assistant Student Council 3; Gym Exhibition l. 
"True as the echo to the sound." 



AVIS BA I CHELDER 

North Weymouth "Avie" 
Business Course 

Class Outing Committee \: Home Room Mess 
enger 4. 

"How all he) ewe was but to he fair, 
And nil he) task In be sweet." 



BARBARA BATCHELDER 

Weymouth Landing "Bee Bee" "Babs" 
General Course 

Book Club |; Glee Club 1. 2, 3, 4; 4-H Club; 
Senior Christmas Parts Committee 4: Junior 
Decorating Committee 3; Volleyball 1; Oper- 
retta 2; Reflector Staff 2, 3. 

Her hair is like the selling sun; 
She herself is full of fun. 



ROBERT BATES 

Weymouth Landing "Bob" 
General Course 

Graduation Reception Committee 4. 
A good sport and a genuine pal. 



JOHN BISOG.N WO 

East Weymouth "Juan" 
Business Course 

Far may we search for one so cheerful. 



THELMA BEALS 

North Weymouth "Teddie" 
Business Course 

Graduation Reception Committee 4; Cheer 
Leader 3, 4. 

Why limit fun, 

When it is enjoyed by everyone? 



HARRY BELCHER 

East Wevmouth 
Business Course 



"Belch" "Prof 



Class History Committee j.; Spanish Club, Presi- 
dent 4: Home Room Club, President 2; 4-H 
Conservation Club 1. 2, 3: Attendance Slips 4; 
Junior Prom Committee. 

/ always get the better when I argue alone. 



CAROL BENSON 

North Wevmouth 

Business Course 
Gree Shorthand Theory Certificate 3; Gregg 
Transcrption Certificate for 60 words a minute 
3; for 80 and 100 4: Candy Girl at Musical 
Revue 4. 

Her generosity is exceeded only by her 
kindness. 



JOSEPH BISOGNANO 

East Weymouth "Jose' 
Business Course 

Intramural Basketball Captain 2. 

He talks a great game. 



WALTER BLAIR 

South Weymouth "Wally" 
Classical Course 

Home Room Club Vice-President 2; Class 
Prophecy Committee 4; Intramural Basketball 1, 
2; Reflector Staff Business Manager 4; Home 
Room Treasurer 3, 4; Senior Play 4. 

"When Diilx whispers low, 'Thou must,' 
The youth replies, 'I can.' " 



JEANNE BLANCHARD 

East Weymouth "Jeannie" 
Business Course 

Home Room Club Treasurer 2; Spanish Club 
\: Assistant Student Council 2; Who's Who Com- 
mittee 4; Girls' Basketball 3, 4; Girls' Gym Exhi- 
bition 1; Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 3; 
Waitress at Reflector Banquet 3. 

"On her and on her high endeavour 
The light of praise shall shine forever." 



BERTRAM BICKFORD 

Weymouth Heights "Bicky" "Bert" 

Business Course 

Intramural Basketball 1, 2: Football 3. 

Why worry when the future takes care of 
itself? 



■Peg" 



MARGARET BLETZER 

North Weymouth 
General Course 

Senior Prom Committee 4: Girls' Basketball 1 ; 
Home Room Club 2. 

"What e'er my fate is, 
'Tis my fate to write." 



HERBERT BILLINGS 

Wevmouth Landing 
Technical Course 

His work is seldom done; 
Still his worries are none. 



RICHARD BOSCHE 

East Weymouth "Dick" "Bosh" 

Technical Course 
Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 3; Who's 
Who Committee 4. 



A real good sport is he, 
As anyone can plainly see. 



a 49 □ 



MARY BOYLE 

Weymouth Landing 
Home Economics Course 

Class Banquet Committee 4. 

Nothing is difficult if you put your heart 
into it. 



CECIL BRETON 

Weymouth Landing 
Classical Course 

Class Prophecy Committee 4; Basketball 2, 3, 4; 
Usher at Graduation 3. 

'Tis not what man does which exalts him, 
but what man would do. 



ETHEL BOYNTON 

North Weymouth "Ethie" "Butch" 

Classical Course 

Class Will Committee 4; Girls' Volleyball 2; 
Home Room Club, Secretary 2. 

"She, that was ever fair and never proud, 
Had tongue at will and yet was never loud." 



MARY BRIGGS 
North Weymouth 
Home Economics Course 

Band 4; Gym Exhibititon 1; Musical Revue 4; 
4-H Club 1, 2; Senior Play 4. 

Always cheerful, always kind, 
Such a girl we like to find. 



BENJAMIN BRAVA 

East Weymouth "Benny" 
Business Course 

Home Room Club, Treasurer 2; Intramural 
Basketball 2, 3, Captain 1. 

A good sport fan, 
Helps to make the man. 



ARNOLD BROWN 

East Weymouth "Brownie" 
General Course 

Football 2, 3, 4. 

To live at ease and not be bound to think. 



ETHEL BRENNAN 
East Weymouth 
Classical Course 



"Mickey' 



Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 1; Honor 
Roll 1: Home Room Club Secretary 2; Class 
Nominating Committee 4; Senior Prom Com- 
mittee 4; Girls' Baseball Team 1; Candy Girl at 
Musical Revue 4; Candy Girl at Operetta 3; 
Lunchroom Cashier 3, 4; Waitress at Reflector 
Banquet 3. 

"Winning each heart and delighting each 
eye." 



GERARD BRENNAN 

South Weymouth "Pop" 
Business Course 

Class Clothing Committee 4; Home Room Club 
2. 

In spite of his size, 

His future will materialize. 



JOHN BRENNAN 
East Wevmouth 
General Course 

Camera Club 2. 



"Heimie" "Red' 



"Let each as likes him best his hours 
employ." 



CATHERINE BUCHANAN 

North Weymouth 
General Course 



"Kay' 



Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 3; Gregg 
Transcription Certificate for 80 and 100 words 
a minute 4: 4-H Club 1: Basketball 2. 



"Laugh and the world laughs -with 



you. 



HAROLD BUKER, JR. 

East Weymouth "Hal' 
Business Course 



'Buke" "Tony' 



Class History Committee Chairman 4; Baseball 
1. 2, 3, \: Basketball 1. 2; Football 1, 2. 3: Fresh- 
man Football Coach 3; Junior Nominating Com- 
mittee Home Room Club. President 2. 

Happy <nn I. from care I'm free, 

Why can't they all be contented like me? 



HENRY BURKE, JR. 

East Weymouth "Doc" 
Classical Course 

Legion Oratorical Contest Winner 4; Home 
Room Club, Treasurer 2; Reflector Staff, Sports 
Editor 1; Junior Outing Committee 3; Class 
Prophecv Committee j: Intramural Basketball 1, 
2: Wrestling 1; Helper in Radio Booth 4: Senior 
Play 4. 

He adorned whatever subject he spoke up- 
on by the most splendid eloquence. 



a a 



WALTER BURKE 

South Weymouth 
Technical Course 



"Wally' 



Home Room Club, Vice-President 2; Assistant 
Student Council 4; Class Will Committee 4. 

"The will to do, the soul to dare." 



SADIE CARROLL 
Weymouth Landing 
Business Course 

Usher at Senior Play 4. 

The sunshine of her laughter penetrates 
our gloom. 



RITA BURKETT 

Weymouth Landing "Fritie" 
Business Course 

Girls' Basketball 1; Home Room Club Secretary 
2; Home Room Committee 2; Mixed Glee Club 
a, 3- 

A comrade blithe and full of glee, 
Who dares to laugh out, loud and free. 



CONSTANCE CARTER 

North Weymouth "Connie" 
General Course 

Roselle Park High School, New Jersey; Dramat- 
ic Club 1; Gills' Soccer 1; Clifton High School, 
New Jersey; President of Footlights Club 3; 
Historian of Photoplay Club 3; Decoration Com- 
mittee for Junior Prom 3; Class Nominating 
Committee 3; Girls' Soccer 2; Squad leader 2, f: 
Messenger Girl 2, 3; Weymouth High Schoo 
Glee Club 4; Press Club Assistant Editor 4. 

She is always bright and merry. 



LOUISE BURNS 
Weymouth Landing 
Classical Course 

User at Musical Revue 4. 

"With modest dignity and calm content. 



EDWARD BYRNE 

South Weymouth "Eddy" 
Classical Course 

Book Club 3, President 4; Home Room Club 
Secretary 2; Senior Christmas Party Committee 
4; Senior Play 4. 

A model true to her profession, 
To Santa Claus she makes her confession: 
"Think not ill of me for I am a man at 
heart." 



PAULINE CHANCE 

South Weymouth "Polly" 
General Course 

Home Room Club Secretary 2; Usher at Musical 
Revue 4. 

Smile and the world smiles with you. 



FREDERICK CHASE 

East Weymouth "Fred" 
Technical Course 

Salutatorian; Four-Year Honor Roll; Student 
Council 2; Chess Club 2; Class "Will Committee 
4; Bookroom 1, 2, 3, 4; Stage Lighting 2, 3, 4. 



A man of great knowledge. 



LYNTON CAMPBELL 
East Weyrnouth 
General Couise 

Track 1, 2, 4. 

He met all men with head erect. 



■Red" 



EDNA CHISHOLM 

East Weymouth "Eddie" 
Home Economics Couise 

Usher at Musical Rex tie 4; Class Banquet Com- 
mittee 4. 

Although she looks gentle and shy, 
There's a twinkle of mischief in her eye. 



GERALDINE CANNON 

Weymouth Landing "Gerry" 
Business Course 

Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 3; Gregg 
Transcription Certificate for 60 words a minute 
3: for 80 and 100 words a minute 4; Home 
Room Club Secretary 2. 

'Knowledge is sympathy, charity, kindness." 



PATRICIA CHURCH 

East Weymouth 

Home Economics Course 



"Pat" "Patty' 



Girls' Basketball 1, 2; Waitress at Reflector 
Banquet 3; Usher at Musical Revue 4; Class 
Banquet Committee 4. 



It's no matter what you do, 
If your heart be only true. 



E3 53 a 



HELEN CIPULLO 

East Weymouth 
Classical Course 

French Club 3, 4; Girls' Basketball 1, 2; Gym 
Exhibition 1, 2; Home Room Messenger 4. 

"Haste thee, Nymph, and bring with thee 
Jest and youthful Jollity." 



VELMA COLLYER 
North Weymouth 
General Course 

Assistant Student Council 3, 4; Student Council 
2; Christmas Party Committee 4; Nominating 
Committee 3; Who's Who Committee 4; Candy 
Girl at Teachers' Play 3. 

Everyone can have a friend 
Who knows how to be a friend. 



PHILIP CLAIN 

East Weymouth "Phil" " Clank" 

General Course 

Reflector Staff, Secretary 4; Aviation Club 4; 
Gym Exhibition 1. 

What's the use of worrying? 



JEAN CONDON 

Weymouth Landing "Red" "Jeanie" 

Classical Course 

Reflector Staff 2, 3, 4; French Club 3, 4; Girls' 
Glee Club 1; Class Prophecy Committee 4. 

"What trusty treasure in this 
world can countervail a friend?" 



PHILIP CLEMENT 

North Weymouth "Phil" "Bud" 

General Course 

Melrose High School Basketball 1; Baseball 1; 
Weymouth High School Press Club 4; Spanish 
Club 4; Who's Who Committee 4; Tennis 2, 3; 
Helper in Radio Booth 4. 

"A wise man is his own best assistant." 



WILLIAM CONNELL 

South Weymouth "Bill" "Comet" 

Business Course 

Assistant Student Council 4; Junior Party Com- 
mittee 3; Senior Prom Committee 4; Baseball 
2, 4; Football 2, 3, 4; Gym Exhibition 2; Intra- 
mural Basketball 2; Track 1, 3, 4. 

Two-fifteen won't be the same, 
When Bill's not there to entertain. 



HUBERT CLEVELAND 

Weymouth Heights "Pete" 
Business Course 

Class Nominating Committee 4; Outing Com- 
mittee 3; Intramural Basketball 2. 

The master of all situations. 



MURIEL CORMACK 

South Weymouth "Dusty" 

Technical Course 
Valedictorian; Four Year Honor Roll; Home 
Room Spelling Bee Champion 3; Book Club 4; 
French Club 4; Glee Club 3; Student Manual 
Staff 4; Operetta 3. 

// knowledge were golden, she would be rich. 



PRISCILLA COLE 

South Weymouth "Cilia 
Business Course 

Class Nominating Committee 4. 

"A truer, nobler, trustier heart, 
More loving or more loyal never beat." 



LOIS COURTNEY 

East Weymouth "Lo" 
Business Course 

Gregg Theory Certificate 3; Gregg Transcription 
Certificate for 60, 80, and 100 words a minute 
3, 4; Book Club 3. 

"The best companions are the best books." 



ELIZABETH COLLINS 

Weymouth Landing "Ginny" 
Classical Course 

Reflector Staff 3, 4; Student Council Assistant 4; 
Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Mixed Glee Club 1, 2; Girls' 
Glee Club 1, 2; Gym Exhibition 1; Class Prophe- 
cy Committee 4; Musical Revue 4; Operetta 1, 2. 
1, 2. 

A merry heart goes all the day. 



MARY COVENEY 

South Weymouth 
General Course 

North Quincy High School 1, 2; Student Coun- 
cil 2; Girls' Bowling Club 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 2; 
Camera Club 1, 2; Decorating Committee 2; 
Gills' Basketball 1, 2; Lunchroom Duty 2; Wey- 
mouth High School 3. 4; Clothing Committee 4; 
Senior Play 4. 

"A good reputation is more valuable than 
money." 



DOROTHY CRAWFORD 
Weymouth Landing 
Business Course 

Four Year Honor Roll: Class Dues Collector 3; 
Home Room Messenger l, 3; Junior High School 
office j: Reflector Staff 2; Gregg Shorthand Cer- 
tificate for 60, 80, and too words a minute 3, 4; 
Gregg Shorthand Theor) Certificate 3: Glee 
Club l, 2; Operetta 1, 2. 



"Her smile is winning 
enchants." 



her personality 



LESLIE CRAWFORD 
South Weymouth 
General Course 



'Les' 



"Speech is great, but silence is greater.' 



MARY CURRY 

Weymouth Landing 
Business Course 

Gregg Transcription Certificate for 80 words a 
minute \: Reflector Stall 3. 1; Girls' Glee Club 
1; Class Prophec) Committee 4. 

"Life is hot at all life without delight." 



ROBERT DAHLSTROM 

Weymouth Landing "Dalilh " 

ltd] nil a I Course 

Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 1, 2; Sen- 
ior Christmas Part) Committee 4; Ticket Col- 
lector at Football Games 4; Clothing Committee 
4- 

"A little nonsense now and then 
Is relished by the best of men." 



HELEN CROMWELL 

Weymouth Landing "Crum" 
Classical Course 

Four Year Honnor Rell, Home Room Spelling 
Bee Champion 1, 2; Reflector Staff 3, 4; French 
Club 3, 4; Girls' Glee Club 1. 

No minutes bring us more content 
Than those in useful studies spent. 



ENRICO DAN U BIO 

East Weymouth 
Business Course 

Press Club 4. 



"Dubo" "Cook' 



It is always good when a man has 
two irons in the fire. 



MARIE CROWLEY 
Weymouth Heights 
General Course 

Reflector Staff 3. 4: Glee Club 1; Outing Com- 
mittee 3; Girls' Basketball 1, 2; Operetta 1. 

She is merry and gay, 
And enjoys life each day. 



JANET CURRIER 

North Weymouth 
General Coune 

Girls' Basketball 1; Class Outing Committee 4; 
Usher at Senior Play 4. 

"Charm strikes the sight, 
But merit wins the soul." 



WILLIAM CURRIER 

South Weymouth 
General Course 

Rest first; then work. 



'Sleepy' 



WILLIAM DAVISON 

North Weymouth 
Technical Course 

Class Outin 



'Happy 



Committee 4. 

go lucky, from care he is free. 



EVELYN DeCOSTE 

East Weymouth "Evie" 
Classical Course 

Girls' Glee Club 1; Graduation Decorating Com- 
mittee 3; Volleyball 1; Freshman-Senior Party 
Entertainment 1: Usher at Senior Play. 

"A day for toil, an hour for sport, 
Hul for a friend is life loo short." 



GEORGE DELOREY 

East Weymouth 
General Course 



'Boogie" 



^enerai course 

Class President 3. 4; Student Council Assistant 
2, 3, 4; Christmas Party Committee f; Gradua- 
tion Decorating Committee 3; Junior Party Com- 
mittee 3; Outing Committee 3; Senior Prom 

Co- 



O' 1' 

(ion Decor;. 

miltee 3; Outing Committee 3; Senior 1 
Committee 4: Baseball 2, 3; Football 1, 2, 3 
Captain 4; Graduation Usher 3. 



'Few words, much ability.' 



□ 57 □ 



JOHN DELOREV 

Weymouth Landing "Johnnie" 
Technical Course 

Student Council 1. 2. 3. 4; President 3, 4; Grad- 
uation Decorating Committee 3; Junior Party 
Committee, Chairman 3; Outing Committee 2; 
Student Council Dance Committee 1, 2, 4: 
Intramural Basketball 1. 2, 3, 4; Track 3, 4; 
Ticket Collector at Musical Revue 4. 

Don't do to-day what you can do 
to-morrow. 



MARY DELOREY 

North Wevmouth "Maria" 
Business Course 

Mixed Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Spanish Club 4; 
Senior Christmas Party Committee 4; Operetta 
i, 2; Musical Revue 4. 

"Gentle in manner, strong in performance." 



ELLEN DOLAN 

South Wevmouth "Lynne" 
Business Course 

Hingham High School 1; Glee Club 1; Girls' 
High School, Boston 2, 3. 

She thinks tlie most good and speaks 
the least ill of her neighbors. 



MARGARET DONAHUE 

South Weymouth "Peg" "Mag" 

Business Course 

Spanish Club 4; Girls' Glee Club 1; Reflector 
Staff 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1; Class Outing Com- 
mittee 4. 

A cute little miss with a winning smile, 
Who will win her way for many a mile. 



ANTOINETTE DeTOMMASO 

East Wevmouth "Toni" 
Classical Course 

4-H Club 1; Mixed Glee Club r, 2, 3; Girls' Glee 
Club 1: Operetta 1, 2; Junior Decorating Com- 
mittee 3; Class Banquet Committee 4. 

"Her friends she has many; 
Her foes— has she any?" 



DONALD DRAKE 

North Weymouth "Don" "Ducky" 

General Course 

Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Wrestling 
2, 3, 4, Co-Captain 4; Ticket Collector at Bas- 
ketball Games 3, 4; Chairman of Class Banquet 
Committee 4. 

A toast to an all-round good fellow. 



GEORGE DIERSCH 

East Weymouth "Georgie" 
Agricultural Course 

Honor Roll 1: Home Room Spelling Bee Cham- 
pion 1: 4-H trip to Philadelphia 3; 4-H Geology 
Club, president 1, 2, 3, 4; 4-H Poultry Club 3, 
president 4; 4-H Garden Club 1, 2, 3, leader 4; 
4-H Service Club 4; 4-H Garden Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Agriculture Judging Vegetables 1, 2, 3, 4; Fruit 
3; Flowers 3; Poultrv 2; Dairy 4; Student Council 
Assistant 2, 3, 4; Ticket Collector at Musical 
Revue 4. 

"Let me live in a house by the side of the 
road, and be a friend to man." 



RICHARD DIZER 

East Weymouth 
Business Course 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Operetta 1 
Revue 4; Class Motto 4. 

Fun is my watchword. 



"Dick" "Ricardo' 



2, 3; Musical 



ROBERT DRAKE 

North Weymouth "Bob" "Ducky" 

General Course 

Junior Party Entertainment Committee 3; 
Spring Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 2; Intramural 
Basketball 1, 2; Wrestling 2, 3, 4; Ticket Col- 
lector at Football Games 1, 2, 3, 4; Charge of 
Gates at Football Games 3, 4: Senior Reception 
Committee 4; Graduation Usher 3. 

Head and shoulders above the crowd. 



MYRTLE DROWN 
South Weymouth 
General Course 

Jamaica Plain High School 
Committee 4. 

"It's nice to be natural 
you're naturally nice." 



"Myrt" 
3: Who's Who 



•hen 



LOUISE DOANE 

Weymouth Landing "Squeeze" 
General Course 

Girls' Glee Club 1; Reflector Staff 3, 4; Who's 
Who Committee 4; Home Room Messenger 1. 

A laughing eye, a merry smile 
Will always make a girl worthwhile. 



MALCOLM DUFFEE 

East Wevmouth "Mai" "Macduff" 

General Course 

Mechanics Arts High School, Boston 1, 2, 3; 
Ticket Collector at Musical Revue 4. 

"Napoleon was also small." 



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RUTH 
DWYER 



WALTER 
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PHYLLIS 
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EDWIN 
FINLAY 



RICHARD 
FISH 



ELIZABETH 
FISHER 



JAMES 
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MARJORIE 
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AURIE DUPLIN 

South Weymouth 

Classical Course 
Mixed Glee Club 1, 2; Girls' Glee Clul> 1, 2; 
Book Club 4; Class History 4; Basketball 1, 2, 
Captain 3, 4; Volleyball 1, 2, 3; Baseball i, 2, 3; 
Track 1. 2; Usher at Musical Revue 4; Home 
Room Messenger 2, 3. 

"A friend in need is a friend indeed." 



RUTH DWYER 

North Weymouth 
Business Course 



'Rutliie' 



Honor Roll 1: Home Room Messenger 1, 3; 
Class Dues Collector 3, 4; Junior Nominating 
Committee 3; Class Prophecy Committee 4; 
Secretary to Mr. Hilmer S. Nelson 4; Theory 
Certificate 3: Gregg Transcription Certificate 
for 60 words a minute 3; Gregg Transcription 
Certificates for 80 words and 100 words a min- 
ute 4: Seller of Football Souvenirs at Thanks- 
giving Day Game 4. 

Personality is the first rung 
up the ladder of success. 

WALTER EASTTEY 

South Weymouth "East" 
Agricultural Course 

Glee Club 2, 3. 4: Operetta 2, 3; Student Council 
2. 3; Trade School Basketball 2, 4; Track Team 

"On with the dance.'" 

ELIZABETH FAHEY 

Easl Weymouth "Betty" 
Classical Course 

Honor Roll 1: Glee Club 1, 2, 3. 4; Treasurer 
of Glee Club 4: Girls' Basketball 1, 2; Home 
Room Messenger 1; Graduation Decorating 
Committee 3: Class Nominating Committee 4; 
Senior Prom Committee 4; Operetta 1, 2, 3; 
Musical Revue 4; Accompanist tor Music Peri- 
ods 1, 2. 3, 4: Lunch Room Cashier 2, 3, 4; 
Senior Plav 4. 

Singing is only one of her many assets. 

EDNA FAY 

South Weymouth "Ed" "Curly" 

Buisness Course 

Glee Club 3, 4; Press Club, Secretary 4; Junior 
Outing Committee 3: Girls' Basketball 2, 3, 4; 
Volleyball 2: Track 2, 3; Gym Exhibition 1; 
Gregg Transcription Certificate for 80 words a 
minute 4: Drum Major 4: Graduation Reception 
Committee, Chairman 4; Debating Club 2, 3. 

"True as the needle to the pole 
Or as the dial to the sun." 



EDWIN FINLAY 

North Weymouth "Bud" "E. J." 

General Course 

Spanish Club 2; Lunch Room Duty 3. 

Heaven's gift to the ladies. 



RICHARD FISH 

East Weymouth 
General Course 

Gun Exhibition •> Wrestling 2 



"Dick" "Minow' 



'Variety is tlic spice of life." 



ELIZABETH FISHER 

East Weymouth "Lizzy" 
General Course 

Class Outing Committee \. 

"Joy rises in me like the summer's morn." 



JAMES FISHER 

East Weymouth "Jim" "Wolf" 

General Course 

Nominating Committee 4; Ticket Seller at Musi- 
cal Revue 4. 

"The great end of life is not knowledge 
but action." 



MAR J OR IE FISHER 

North Weymouth "Margie" "Midge" 

Classical Course 

Four- Year Honor Roll; D. A. R. Candidate 4: 
French Club 3. 4; Junior Party Committee 3; 
Junior Decorating Committee 3; Class Prophecy 
Committee 4; Basketball 1. 2: Baseball 1. 2: 
Volleyball 1, 2; Gym Exhibition 1; Student 
Council 2, 3; Lunchroom Duty 2, 3, 4; Candy 
Girl at Musical Revue 4. 

hi even and sweet disposition lias she, 
And friends with her delight to be. 



PHYLLIS FEIST 

South Weymouth "Phil" 
Classical Course 

French Club 3: Class Will Committee 4; Reflec- 
tor Staff 4: Candy Girl at Football Games 1, 2, 3; 
Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 4. 

A friend and pal so good and true, 
Where can we find another like you? 



CAROL FITCH 
Weymouth Landing 
Genera] Course 

Usher at Musical Revue \: Class Motto Com 
mittee 4. 

"// is good 



To lengthen lo the last a sunny mood." 



n 61 n 



JAMES FITZPATRICK 

North Weymouth "Fitzie" 
General Course 

Baseball 1, 2, Captain 3; Football 2, 3; Basket- 
ball 1, 2, 3, 4; Chairman of Class Outing Com- 
mittee 4. 

Quiet at first, but look again! 



MILDRED GARDNER 

North Weymouth "Nan" 
Classical Course 

lie/lector Staff 3, 4; Art Editor 4; Student Coun- 
cil Assistant 4: Christmas Party Decorating Com- 
mittee 4; Senior Prom Committee 4; Senior 
Play 4. 

"Art is the perfection of good nature." 



JOHN FLYNN 
South Weymouth 
General Course 

Golf 1, 2; Wrestling 1. 

"You come late, yet you. come." 



GLORIA GAROFALO 

East Weymouth "Pat" 
Classical Course 

French Club 3; Basketball 1, 2; Baseball 1, 2; 
Volleyball 1, 2; Gym Exhibition 1; Graduation 
Reception Committee 4. 

"Laugh and the world laughs with you." 



JESSE FRANCIS 

East Weymouth 
General Course 

"Much ado about nothing.' 



ELEANOR FRENCH 

South Weymouth 
Classical Course 

Class History Committee 4; 



"Frenchy' 



Senior Play 4. 



"All ivho would joy win 
Must share it." 



LOIS FRENCH 
South Wevmouth 
Classical Course 

Honor Roll 1; Home Room Spelling Champion 
1, 3- 

A good sport, a loyal friend, 

A worker on whom you can depend. 



VIRGINIA GARRITY 

North Weymouth "Ginnie" 
Business Course 

Girls' Glee Club t; Mixed Glee Club i, 2; Jun- 
ior Prom Committee 3; [unior Outing Commit- 
tee 3; Class Prophecy Committee 4; Girls' Bas- 
ketball 1; Reflector Staff 3, 4; Operetta r, 2; 
Student Council 2; Cheerleader 4; Reflector 
Delegate 3; Secretary of the Southeastern Mas- 
sachusetts League of School Publications 4. 

The life of the party wherever she goes. 



EDNA GATELY 

North Weymouth "Blondie" 
General Course 

Woodward Institute 1, 2, 3; Basketball t, 2, 3; 
( kiss Treasurer 1; (unior Prom Committee 3; 
Operetta Make-Up Committee 1; Athletic Club 
i, 3: Handicraft Club 2. 

"Give me a look, give me a face 
That makes simplicity a grace." 



ARMIRANDA GIACOBBE 

East Weymouth "Nan' 
Home Economics Course 



"Chick" 



Glee Club 3; Cafeteria Duty 1. 2: Usher at Sen- 
ior Pla\ |. 



Musi( hath charms." 



NANCY GAILUS 

East Weymouth "Nan" 
Business Course 

Girls' Glee Club 3, 4; Home Room Messenger 
4; Usher at Senior Plav 4. 

"The gentle mind by gentle deeds is knoxvn." 



RAYMOND GIFFORD 

Weymouth Landing 
General Course 

Vviation Club |: Chess Club 1. ■. 
Club 3; Wrestling 3. 4; Baseball 
Council Assistant 3. 



"Ray" "Giff" 

2. 3: Science 
3; Student 



'Hang sorrow! Care will kill a cat, 
And therefore let's be merry." 



GEORGE GILLIGAN 

South Weymouth "Gil" 
General Course 

Junior Nominating Committee 3; Junior Prom 
Committee 3: Senior Prom Committee 4; As- 
sistant Student Council 3; Student Council 4; 
Student Council Dance Committee 4; Wrestling 
1; Football 3; Baseball 3; Musical Revue 4. 

Listen to him beat that drum; 
He pleases all, and not just some. 



EDWARD GRANT 

Weymouth Landing "Eddie" 
General Course 

Basketball Manager 2; Football 3, 4; Spring 
Track 4. 

"To mourn a niiscliief that is past and gone 
Is the real way to draw new mischief on." 



RAYMOND GILLIS 

South Wevmouth "Ray" "Gillis" 

Agricultural Course 

4-H Geologv Club 4; 4-H Conservation Club 2; 
Christmas Party Committee 4; Agriculture Judg- 
ing, Poultry 1, 2; Flowers 3: Vegetables 1; 
Dairv 2. 4; Musical Revue Ticket Collector 4. 

"The only way to have a friend is to be 
one." 



KATHLEEN GILLMAN 

East Wevmouth 
Business Course 



"Arty' 



Junior High Office 4; Boston Herald Spelling 
Bee, 1. 2; Gregg Theorv Certificate 3; Gregg 
Shorthand Speed 60 words 3: Gregg Shorthand 
Speed 80 words 4; Gregg Shorthand Speed 100 
words 4; Spanish Club 3, 4: Basketball r; Girls' 
Graduation Clothing Committee 4. 

What is hidden behind thai (jiiict coun- 
tenance? 



GEORGE GLOSTER 

Weymouth Landing "Cappy" 
Classical Course 

Band 1. 2. 3, 4: Orchestra 1, 2, 3. 4; .Musical 
Revue 4: Class Outing 4. 

"The mind's the standard of the man." 



RICHARD GOODWIN 

North We\ mouth "Dick" 
General Course 

Bo\s' Graduation Clothing Committee 4. 

"Let me but do my work from day to day." 



AMERIGO GRILLO 

South Weymouth 
General Course 



"Mickey' 



Home Room Attendant 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 2; 
Baseball 1: Track Team 1, 2; Assistant Student 
Council \. 

"Young fellows will be young fellows." 



RICHARD GRISDALE 

Weymouth Landing 
Technical Course 



"Denny' 



Class Prophecy Committee 4; Tennis Team 2, 3, 

4- 

"He thai ((implies against his will 
Is of the same opinion still." 



ROBERT GROVES 

East Weymouth "Bob" 
General Course 

Student Council Assistant 4. 

"My favored temple is a humble heart." 



BEATRICE HAAS 

South Wevmouth "Beattie" 
Business Course 

Girls' Glee Club 2: Glee Club 2. 3; Press Club 

4; Shorthand Theory Certificate 3. 

"A faithful friend is the medicine of life." 



HAROLD GORMAN, JR. 

South Wevmouth "Hal" 
General Course 

"He lives by rule who lives himself to 
please." 



ETHEL HAMILTON 

North Weymouth "Hamy" 
Business Course 

Home Room Messenger 3. 4; Bookroom Secre- 
tary \: Spanish Club [; Senior Christmas Party 
Committee 4: Usher at Musical Revue 4. 

"Her smile was like a morn in June." 





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HANS! N 



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H VRDELL 



ARTII I R 
HARPER 



SHIRLEY 
HART 



66 



MAR JORIE 
HARTFORD 



MARY 
HAYES 



SHIRLEY 
1 1 \/I I I I 



CH \RLES 
HEARN 



PHYLLIS 
HEBERT 



FRANCIS 
HEGER 



RITA HAM AN 
East Weymouth 
Business Course 

Home Room Messenger 2, 4: Girls' Glee Club 1, 
3, 4: Harmony Club 1; Usher at Musical Revue 
4; Gregg Transcription Certificate 4. 

"A poet in our midst." 



M AR J ORIE HARTFORD 

Weymouth Landing "Marjie" "Midge" 
Classical Course 

French Club 3. 4; Girls' Glee Club 1, 2; Press 
Club ); (lass Will Commit tec 4; Home Room 
Spelling Bee Champion 4. 

A happy disposition is a gift of nature. 



FRANCIS HAN IF AN 

East Weymouth "Frannie" 
General Course 

"Let gentleness my strong enforcement be." 



MARY HAYES 

Weymouth Landing "Haysie" 
Classical Course 

Girls' Glee Club 2; Mixed Glee Club 2, 3; 
Class Nominating Committee 3, 4; Senior Prom 
Committee 4; Basketball 1; Reflector Staff 2, 3, 
4- 

"// is better to be faithful than famous." 



ALICE HANSEN 

Weymouth Landing "Al" 
Business Course 

Who's Who Committee 4; Shorthand Theory 
Certificate 3: Gregg Transcription Certificate 3; 
Gregg Transcription Certificate 4. 

"There are some silent people who are more 
interesting than the best talkers." 



SHIRLEY HAZLETT 

East Weymouth "Zeke" 
Home Economics Course 

Girls' Glee Club 1; Glee Club 1; 2, 3, 4; Basket- 
ball 1; Indoor Baseball 2: Volleyball 2; Gym 
Exhibition 2; Operetta 1, 2, 3; Musical Revue 4. 

A cheerful companion is more to 
be desired than gold. 



LOUISA HARDELL 

South Wevmouth 
General Course 

There are but few who know 
the hidden treasures in thee. 



'Weezy' 



CHARLES HEARN. JR. 

North Wevmouth "Bud" 
General Course 

Home Room .Messenger 1; Senior Party Enter- 
tainment t; Senior Reception Committee 4; 
Intramural Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Gym Team 1, 2; 
Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Track i, 2, 3, 4; Wrestling 

3- 4- 

When shall zee look upon his like again? 



ARTHUR HARPER 

East Weymouth "Vin" "Harpo" 

Technical Course 

Who's Who Committee 4: Tennis Team 3. 4; 
Gym Exhibition 2: Debating Club 3, 4. 

"Mine honor is my life; both grow in one; 
Take honor from me and nix life is done." 



PHYLLIS HEBERT 

South Wevmouth "Phil" 
Business Course 

Girls' Glee Club i, 2; Mixed Glee Club 1. 2. 3, 
4: Operetta 1, 2. 3; Class Banquet Committee 4. 

"Oh, blest with temper whose undoubted ray 
Can make to-morrow cheerful as to-day!" 



SHIRLEY HART FRANCIS HECER 

Wevmouth Landing "Mutt" East Wevmouth "Frannie" -Frank" 

Classical Course General Course 

Glee Club i, 2. 3, 4; Gun Exhibition 1; Oper- Track Team Manager 3, 4; Bookroom Duty 4: 

etta 1, 2; Musical Revue 4: Reflector Staff 2, 3, Class Outing Committee 4. 

"Nothing's so hard but search will find it 

"I do but sing because I must." out." 

n □ 



ROBERT HIGGINS 

East Weymouth "Hig" 
General Course 

Home Room Messenger a; Junior Party Commit- 
tee 3: Intramural Basketball 1, a, 3, 4; Lunch 
Room Duty a. 

"Play not for gain but sport." 



ELEANOR HOPF 

North Weymouth "El" 
Classical Course 

(.ills' Glee Club 2; Junior Part) Committee 3; 
Class Prophecy Committee 4; Basketball 1. 

Why iuork when plays is more fun? 



BETTY HILL 

South Weymouth "Bet" 
General Course 

Glee Club 1, 2; Class History Committee 4; 
Student Council 4; Editor of the Maroon and 
Gold 4; Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 3. 

"Her voice was ever soft, gentle, and low." 



WILLIAM HOWE 

East Weymouth "Bill" 
General Course 

Gym Team 1; Senior Christmas Party Commit- 
tee 4. 

"And when a lady's in the case, 
You know all other things give place." 



JOHN HOFFMAN 

East Weymouth "Hotfoot" 
Technical Course 

Student Council Assistant 2; Band 2, 3; Orches- 
tra 3; Class History Committee 4; Musical 
Revue 4. 

"How hard it is to hide the sparks of nature!" 



NELLIE HOWSBERGER 

Weymouth Landing "Nell" 
Classical Course 

Home Room Treasurer 4; Glee Club 1; Junior 
Part) Committee 3; Junior Nominating Com- 
mittee <]; Class History Committee 4; Basket- 
ball 1. 

"The greatest pleasure in life is doing what 
people say you cannot do." 



HELEN HOLBROOK 

East Weymouth 
Business Course 

Girls' Glee Club 3. 

"Her eyes express the sweetest kind of 
bashf ulness." 



ROBERT HOLBROOK 

South Weymouth "Bob" 
General Course 

Student Council Assistant 3; Band r, 2, 3, 4; 
Senior-Freshman Party Entertainment 1; Junior 
Nominating Committee 3; Senior Nominating 
Committee 4; Graduation Reception Committee 
4; Intramural Basketball 3, 4. 

"Measures, not men, have always been my 
mark." 



JOHN HULL 

North Weymouth "Jack" 
General Course 

Home Room Treasurer 4; Glee Club 1; Junior 
Class Motto Committee 4; Gym Team 1, 2; 
Cross Country Team 3, Captain 4; Track Team 
2, 3, 4; Band 4; Musical Revue 4. 

"Oh, what may man within him hide 
Though angel on the outward side!" 



FRANCES HUNT 

Weymouth Landing "Franny" 
Business Course 

Home Room Messenger 1; Class Outing Com- 
mittee 4. 

Anything for a quiet life. 



VIRGINIA HOPE 

North Weymouth "Ginny" 
General Course 

Choral Speaking Club 1; Graduation Reception 
Committee 4; Basketball 2; Deck Tennis 3; Vol- 
leyball a. 

"Laugh and the zeorld laughs with you." 



MARGARET HUNT 

East Weymouth "Peggy" "Mag" 

Business Course 

Home Room Messenger 1, a; Class Will Com- 
mittee 4; Student Council 2. 

A true friend is the greatest of all blessings. 



ROSEMARY HURD 

South Weymouth "Rosie" 
General Course 

Baskethall 2, 3, 4; Choral Speaking Club 1; 
Volleyball 2, 3, 4. 

Be content to seem what you really are. 



GARRETT KEEGAN 

Weymouth Landing "Ga" 
Classical Course 

Chess Club 1, 2; Radio Club 1; Senior Recep- 
tion Committee 4. 

"He that hath knowledge spareth his words." 



JEANETTE IRELAND 

East Weymouth "Irish" 
Home Economics Course 

Class Banquet Committee 4; Senior Party Com- 
mittee 4; Lunch Room Duty 1, 2; Candy Girl 
at Musical Revue 4; Senior Play 4. 

"Small in size but great in wit." 



MARY KEOHAN 

Weymouth Landing 
Business Course 

Senior Outing Committee 4. 

"Where words are scarce, they are 
seldom spent in vain." 



THERESA JEWELL 
East Weymouth 
Business Course 

Usher at Musical Revue 4; Girls' Graduation 
Clothing Committee 4. 

"Speech is great, but silence is greater." 



PAUL KEOHAN 

Weymouth Landing "Cohen" "Pablo" 

Business Course 

Camera Club 2; 4-H Club 1, 2, 3; Puppet Show 
Ticket Collector 2; Boys' Graduation Clothing 
Committee 4. 

Silence makes the mind grow wiser. 



CARL JOHNSON 

South Weymouth 
General Course 

Oh, for an airplane! 



RUBY KILLAM 

South Weymouth "Twin" 
Classical Course 

French Club 4; Class Will Committee 4; Organ- 
ization Committee for Student Council Manual 
4; Basketball 1; Girls' Softball Team 1, 2; Vol- 
leyball 1, 2; Candy Girl at Football Games 1, 2. 

A jolly good pal is long remembered. 



HELEN KEARNS 

East Weymouth "Keamsie" 
Classical Course 

Fiench Club 3, 4; Who's Who Committee 4; 
Girls' Glee Club 1; Gym Exhibition r; Home 
Room Messenger 4; Usher at Musical Revue 4; 
Class Outing Committee 4. 

Her only fault is that she has no fault. 



RUTH KILLAM 

South Weymouth "Ritthie" "Tivinnie" 
Classical Course 

Class Nominating Committee 4: Class Prophecs 
Committee ); Girls' Softball Team 2; Girls' Vol- 
leyball Team 1. 2: Assistant to Editor-in-Chief 
of Student Council Manual 4; Candy Girl at 
Football Games 1. 2; Home Room Messenger 3; 
Class Outing Committee 4. 

"True to her ivord, her work, and her 
friends." 



RITA KEEFE 

South Weymouth "Keefie" 
Business Course 

Christmas Party Committee 4; Class History 
Committee 4; Home Room Spelling Bee Cham- 
pion 1. 

"Her bright smile haunts me still." 



PRISCILLA KUNZ 

Weymouth Landing "Prissy" 
General Course 

Who's Who Committee 4: Basketball Team 2; 
Girls' Glee Club 1, 2; Gym Exhibition 1. 2. 

"And join with thee calm 
Peace and Quiet." 



an 



JOHN LaROCCO 

East Weymouth "Johnny" 
Business Course 

Graduation Decorating Committee 3; Baseball 
3. 4: Intramural Basketball 2; Golf 2, 3, 4; 
Assistant Football Manager 3. 4: Track 4. 

A man of many words. 



DORO I m: A LEEMING 

North Weymouth "Dot" "Dottie" 

Business Course 

Glee Club . 3, \; Girls' Basketball l earn 2. 3, \; 
Girls' Baseball Team 3; (.iris' Tennis Team 3; 
Volleyball 8. 

"As pure «■> a pearl mid a\ perfect/' 



CLARA LA ROSS A 
East Wevmouth 
Business Course 

Basketball 2; Gym Exhibition 1, 

"A good companion 
Makes good compan\ ." 



LEONARD LEINONEN 

North Weymouth 
Technical Course 

"So live and laugh nor be dismayed. 



LARS LARSSON 
East Weymouth 
General Course 

Senior Banquet Committee 4. 

"Though I am always in haste, 
I am never in a hurry." 



MAR JORIE LEONARD 

Weymouth Heights "Marjie" 
General Course 

Drum Major 2. 3. j; Volleyball 1; Home Room 
Messenger 1; Reflector Staff 3, 4. 

"Forever smiling, always on the go." 



Tina" "Droopy' 



CHRISTINE LAWTON 

South Wevmouth "Chris" 
Business Course 

Drivers' Club 3, 4: Harmony Club 1; Glee Club 
1; Operetta 1; Girls' Basketball 1, 2; Candy Girl 
at Musical Revue r. 

"Anything hut history, 
For history must be false." 



MARGARET LESENECHAL 

North Weymouth "Marg" 
Classical Course 

Four-Year Honor Roll: Class Dues Collector 3, 
4; Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 2: Girls' 
Glee Club 1; Mixed Glee Club 1, 2, 3; French 
Club 3; President 4; French Club Play 3; Oper- 
etta 1, 2: Class Will Committee 4; Class Outing 
Committee 4. 

"Moderation, the noblest gift of Heaven." 



AGNES LEAHY 
East Weymouth 
Business Course 

I'sher at Senior Play 4. 
"As quiet as a mouse.' 



MAR JORIE LESTER 

East Wevmouth "Margie" 
Home Economics Course 

Basketball Team 1: Volleyball Team 2: Gym 
Exhibition 1 . 2. 

"All things are icon by diligence." 



WILLIAM LEARY 

South Wevmouth "Will' 
Classical Course 

Book Club 3, 4; Senior Banquet Committee 4. 
"Wisdom is the wealth of the wise." 



ALICE LeVANGIA 

East Weymouth "Al" "Allie" 

General Course 

Basketball 1; Candy Girl at Operetta 3: Gvm 
Exhibition 1. 2; Library Assistant 2; I.unch 
Room Dut) 3. 

"Her heart is as true as steel." 



E3 3 □ 



DONALD LIBBV 

Weymouth Lauding "Don" "Lib" 

General Course 

Hand 4; Musical Revue 4. 

"Knowledge comes, but wisdom lingers." 



GEORGE LYMBURN 

South Weymoulh "Epidemic" 
General Course 

Quincy High School 1. 2, 3; Basketball 1, 2; Rifle 
Team 2, 3; Secretary 3; Track 1, 2, 3; Indoor 
Track 2, 3; "Golden Rod" Agent 2; Christmas 
Part) Committee |. 

Never lei studies interfere with pleasure. 



JOSEPH LIVA 

Weymouth Landing "Joe" 
Business Course 

Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 4; Student 
Council Assistant 3. 

Merry am I! From studies I'm free! 

Why aren't all students contented like me? 



CLARA LYSAKOWSKI 

North Weymouth "Chubby" Blondie" 

Business Course 

Home Room Messenger 1: Drivers' Club 4; 
Basketball 2. 

"What now? What new formed mischief?" 



PEARL MacALLISTER 

North Weymouth "Perla" 
THOMAS LONG Business Course 

East Wey mouth "Henry" Home Room Messenger 3; Usher at Senior Play 



Business Course 



4- 



Take it slow and steady. Anything for a quiet life. 



DAVID LOVELL 

East Weymouth 
Business Course 

The little man who wasn't there. 



MARY MacDONALD 

North Weymouth "Billie 
Business Course 

,^ „ Glee Club 2; Operetta 2. 

Dave 1 

"Her nimble fingers 

Make merry music." 



EDWARD LUCAS 

East Weymouth "Luke" 
Business Course 

Reflector Staff Secretary 4. 

"It is better to be faithful than famous." 



PHYLLIS MacDONALD 

South Weymouth "Phyl" 
Classical Course 

Class Treasurer 3, 4; Girls' Glee Club 1; French 
Club 3, 4: Mixed Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Entertain- 
ment at Junior Party 3; Junior Nominating 
Committee 3: Junior Party Committee 3; Orches- 
tra 1. 3, 4: Operetta 2: Musical Revue \: Assist- 
ant Student Council 2; Lunch Room Duty 2: 
Home Room Messenger 2. 

Not very tall, not very small 

But fair and sweet, and loved by all. 



ALEX LUCIANO 

East Weymouth "A I" "Lilic" 

Business Course 

President Home Room Club 1; Tech Tourna- 
ment Basketball Team Manager 2, 3; Football 
Manager 1; Gym Exhibition 1, 2; Wrestling 2. 

Why study when there are other things 
to do? 



WILLIAM MacDONALD 

East Weymouth "Bill" "Mac ' 

Business Course 

Intramural Basketball 1, 2. 3: Varsity Basket- 
ball 4; Lunch Room Duty 2, 3; Home Room 
Messenger 1. 

Good Sportsmanship, a quality prized by 
many but held by few. 



DOROTHEA MacDOUGALL 

East Weymouth "Dot' 
Business Course 

She is a mirror of sincerity. 



ANGUS MacLEOD 

North Weymouth "Skipper" 
Classical Course 

/'// set it done to-morrow. 



PATRICIA MADDOX 

East Weymouth "Pat" 
Classical Coudse 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3. 4; Class Prophecy Committee 
4; Junior Prom Committee 3: Basketball 4; 
Track 1 : Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 
1, 3; Junior Class Champion 3; Semi-Finals 
Champion, Herald-Traveler Building 3; Musical 
Revue 4: Operetta 1; Usher at Puppet Show 3. 

A ready wit, a -winning smile. 

Eyes that are dancing all the while. 



LUCILLE MAJOR 

Weymouth Heights 
Classical Course 



"Margie' 



Class Dues Collector j; Home Room Messenger 
1; French Club 3, 4: Glee Club 1; Class Phophecy 
Committee 4; Junior Outing Committee 3; 
Lunchroom Dut\ 2. 

Many come, many go, 

But few like her do any know. 



WILLIAM MARDEN 

East Weymouth 
General Course 

Astronomy Club 1; Safety Driving Club 4. 

A fairly quiet unusual sort, 
Talks very little but says a lot. 



KATHERINE Mc ALEER 
North Weymouth 
Business Course 



"Kay' 



Cheer Leader 3. 4: Class Secretary 3, 4; Junior 
Decorating Committee 3: Girls' Basketball 1; 
Lunchroom Dut\ 4; Student Council 3; Junior 
Part} Committee 3. 

Pep, personality and wit, 
Each of these exactly fit. 



ROBERT MA HONEY 

Wevmouth Landing "Doc" 
Business Course 

Class Nominating Committee 4: Junior Party 
Committee 3: Basketball Manager 3. 4; Football 
3; Intramural Basketball 1, 2, 3; Graduation 
Usher 3. 

Good personality is the main highway to 
success. 



FRANCIS McCUE 

North Wevmouth "Red" 
General Course 

Home Room Messenger 2, 3: Football 3, 4; In- 
tramural Basketball 1. 2: Track 2; Wrestling 

1, 4- 

At last.' He arrives! 



GEORGE MAHONEY 

Wevmouth Landing "Junie" 
Technical Course 

Senior Prom Committee 4: Tennis 3, 4; Ticket 
Collector at Senior Play 4. 

"So live and laugh, nor be dismayed." 



CLICK MAHONEY 

Wevmouth Landing "Mac" "Darino" 

Business Course 

Assistant Manager Football Team 1: Wrestling 
2. 3; Student Council 4; Junior Nominating 
Committee 3. 

His ready wit relieves us of many dull 
moments 



GLADYS McCUE 

North Weymouth "Gladie" 
Business Course 

Glee Club 1; Musical Revue 1. 
Laughter reigns supreme. 



SHIRLEY Mt DERMOTT 

South Wevmouth "Mac" 
Business Course 

Glee Club 1: Class Prophecy Committee 4: Girls' 
Baseball 1. 2. 3; Girls" Basketball 1. 2. 3: Volley- 
ball 1. 2: Gym Exhibition 1. 2: Gregg Short- 
hand Theory Certificate 3: Gregg Transcription 
Certificate for 60 words a minute \: Gregg I ran 
scription for 80 words a minute 1: Gregg Trtn- 
scription for Mo words a minute 4: Gregg Tran- 

Happy-go-lucky from morning till night. 



KATHLEEN McGLYNN 
South Weymouth 
Business Course 



'Kay' 



scription Certificate for 60 words a minute 3; 
Gregg Transcription Certificate for 80 words a 
minute 4; Gregg Transcription Certificate for 
100 words a minute 4; Trade School Office 4. 

Accuracy and promptness aid success. 



WILLIAM McNULTY, JR. 

North Weymouth "Mac" "Bill' 

Business Course 

Intramural Basketball 2, 3; Wrestling 
Student Council Assistant 3. 

For every "why" he has a "wherefore". 



3- 4; 



PRISCILLA McINTIRE 

North Weymouth 
Business Course 



'Mac" "Cilia' 



Class Outing Committee 4. 

On their own merits tlie modest are dumb. 



JOHN McKINNEY, JR. 

South Weymouth "Flash' 
Business Course 

Class Outing Committee 4. 

Success is his goal. 



WARREN McKINNON 

North Weymouth "Hop" 
Classical Course 

Class Vice-President 3, 4: Class Nominating 
Committee 3: Junior Decorating Committee 3; 
Junior Part) Committee 3: Baseball 2. 3, 4; 
Baseball Captain \: Basketball 2, 3; Football 1, 
2. 3. 4: Intramural Basketball 1; Usher at Grad- 
uation 3. 

Though he lives in the light of youthful 
glee, 

"He is full of great aims and bent on bold 
em prize." 



WILLIAM MEARA, JR. 

South Weymouth "Bill" 
Classical Course 

Glee Club r; Junior Outing Committee 3; 
Senior Christmas Party Entertainment Com- 
mittee 4; Senior-Freshman Party Entertainment 
Committee 1: Lunchroom Duty 4; Student 
Council Assistant 4; Class Prophecy Committee 
4; Senior Play 4. 

Although his work is the best, 
It does not hinder his jest. 



DAVID MILLER 

Weymouth Landing 
C 1 is:,ic d Course 



'Day' 



Debating Club 3: Radio Club 3; Class Banquet 
Committee \: Intramural Basketball 1, 2; Lab- 
oratory Assistant 4; Lunchroom Duty 2. 

A good sport and a friend indeed. 



GEORGE MILLER 
Fast Weymouth 
Business Course 

Football 3 



"Glen" "Q_uail' 



Wresding j. 
Is he always so quiet f I wonder! 



KATHLEEN McLAUGHLIN 

Weymouth Landing "Kay" 
Classical Course 

Class Clothing Committee 4: Book Club 4; Press 
Club j; Gym Exhibition 1. 

Why worry? It never pays. 



OLGA MILLIGAN 

Weymouth Landing 
Business Course 

Usher at Musical Revue 4. 

To be living is sublime. 



'Liz" "Heron' 



ANNA McNALLY 

South Wevmouth "Mac" 
General Course 

Mixed Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Press Club 4; Senior 
Play Usher \; Operetta 1; Musical Revue 4. 

A nei'er-changing smile, 
A never-tiring friend. 



DOROTHY MILNER 

North Wc\ mouth "Dot" 
Classical Course 

Honor Roll 1; Class Histor) Committee \: 
Room Spelling Bee Champion 1, [. 

"Sportsmanship and friendliness" is her 
motto. 



n 79 n 



FLORENCE M IN ASIAN 

East Weymouth "Flossie" 
Business Course 

Senior Play Usher 4: Orchestra 3, 4; Gregg Short- 
hand Theory Certificate 3: Gregg Transcription 
Certificate for 60 words a minute 3: Gregg Tran- 
scription Certificate for 80 words a minute 4; 
Gregg Transcription Certificate for 100 words 
a minute 4. 

"A heart as soft, a heart as kind, 
As in the whole world thou canst find." 



MARY MO I TOLA 

Soul I] We\ mouth "Peppy" 
Business Course 

t'shci at Musical Re\ uc |: <'>< gg Shorthand 
Theoi \ Certificate 3: Gregg 'transcription Cert- 
ificate for Ho words a minute 4; Home Room 
Spelling Bee Champion Finals 2. 

.1 smile and a good word for all. 



HELEN MITCHELL 

South Weymouth "Hunti" 
Classical Course 

Editor-in-Chief of Press Club 4; Senior Prom 
Committee 4: Room Spelling Bee Champion 3. 

The best things come in small packages. 



ROY MUNROE 

East Weymouth "Von" 
Business Course 

Glee Club 2, 3. 4; Musical Revue 4; Class Cloth- 
ing Committee 4; Operetta 2, 3. 

I toast to a grand fellow. 



RUTH MITCHELL 

South Weymouth "Ruthie" 
Classical Course 

Press Club 4; Class History Committee 4. 

Personality , neatness, and laughter are hers. 
May they remain with her all through the 
years! 



MARGARET MORRILL 

East Weymouth "Mig" 
Business Course 

Four- Year Honor Roll; Vice-President Spanish 
Club 4: Class Motto Committee 4: Gregg Short- 
hand Theory Certificate 3; Gregg Transcription 
Certificate for 60 words a minute 3; Gregg Tran- 
scription Certificate for 80 words a minute 4; 
Gregg Transcription Certificate for 100 words a 
minute 4; Senior Play 4. 

True to her word, her work, and her friends. 



JESSIE MURRAY 
South Weymouth 
Classical Course 



"Babe" "Jess" 



Girls' Glee Club 1; Mixed Glee Club 3. 4; Press 
Club \: Graduation Reception Committee 4; 
Musical Revue 4; Operetta 3: Gym Exhibition 1. 

Begone, dull cares, and let me be. 



FRIEDA NAEGELE 

East Weymouth -Free' "Sailor" 

Business Course 

Class Banquet Committee 4. 

A better friend is ne'er to be found. 



ELOISE MORRISON 

North Weymouth "El" 
Classical Course 

Class Dues Collector 3. 4; Class Will Committee 
y. Nominating Committee 3, 4; Girls' Basketball 
1, 2; Volleyball 1, 2. 

Always cheerful and full of fun, 

With a gleaming smile that rivals the sun. 



EDiTH NERGER 
East Weymouth 
General Course 

Glee Club 4: Musical Revue [. 

"Thought is deeper than speech. 



MARTHA MORRISON 

North Weymouth "Mar die" 

Classical Course 
Home Room Messenger 2; Book Club 4; Christ- 
mas Party Decorating Committee 4; Class Out- 
ing Committee 4; Usher at Puppet Show 3. 

"Whate'er she did was done with so much 
ease, 

In her alone, 'twas natural to please." 



EVELYN NICHOLS 

North Weymouth "Nickie" "F.vie" "Bunny' 
Business Course 

Class Banquet Committee [. 

Good humor seems to follow her. 



MARILYN NICKERSON 

Weymouth Landing "Nickie" 
Classical Course 

Glee Club 4: Press Club 4; Who's Who Com- 
mittee 4; Musical Revue 4: Reflector Stall 3, [; 
Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 1. 

Forever smiling, always on the go, 

From her blithe spirit, happiness doth flow. 



JOHN O'CONNOR 

Weymouth Landing "Cooker" 
Classical Course 

loin -Yeai llonoi Roll: (unioi Pain Committee 
3: Class History Committee 4; Intramural 
Basketball 1: Lunchroom Duty 3; Senior Play 4. 

A lad of great versatility, 
Full <if knowledge and ability. 



DOMINICK NISTA 

East Wevmouth "Dom" 
General Course 

Christmas Party Committee 4; Junior Decorat- 
ing Committee 3; Baseball 3, 4; Basketball 3; 
Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Wrestling 3. 

We like and admire him as a friend, as an 

athlete and as a student. 



CONSTANCE O'NEIL 

South Weymouth "Connie" 
Classical Course 

Home Room Messenger 1, 4; Girls' Glee Club 1; 
Class History Committee 4; Lunchroom Duty 2; 
Reflector Start 2, 3, 4. 

With laughing eyes and merry smile, 
Her disposition happy all the while. 



JOHN NOLAN 

South Weymouth "Jon 
General Course 

Graduation Reception Committee 4. 

// silence is golden, 
He ynust be poor. 



MARGARET O'NEIL 

Weymouth Landing "Margie" 
Classical Course 

Home Room Messenger 2. 3; Book Club 3, 4; 
Who's Who Committee 4; Girls' Baseball 1; 
Volleyball 1. 

Eyes of blue and a smile that's true. 



RICHARD NORWOOD 

East Weymouth "Dick" 
Business Course 

Class Motto Committee 4; Home Room Spell- 
ing Bee Champion 2. 

His only fault is that he has none. 



HELEN PAIGE 

North Wevmouth 
Business Course 

Graduation Reception Committee |: Student 
Council Assistant |; Lunchroom Dim \: Gregg 
Transcription Certificate for 80 words a minute 
\: Gregg Transcription Certificate for 100 words 
a minute \: and Gregg Theory Certificate 3. 

Capable and a -winning personality. 



ELIZABETH O'BRIEN 

North Weymouth "Betty" 
Business Course 

Gym Exhibition 1; Gregg Transcription Cei 
lificate for 80 words a minute 4. 

She's not noisy, loud or gay, 

But enjoys life in a sweet quiet way. 



[AMES PAN ETTA, JR. 

North Weymouth "Jim" 
Business Course 

Class Nominating Committee [; Chairman of 
Class Prophecy Committee |: Baseball 3. [-. 
Football I, 2, 3, |. 

A regular sport and friend to all. 



DORIS O'CONNOR 
South Weymouth 
General Course 

Senior Christmas Party Committee 
Basketball 1; Lunchroom Duty 1, 2: 
Staff 2, 3, 4: Student Council 1, 2. 



4; Girls 
Reflector 



"Wit to persuade and beauty to delight." 



ROBERT PANORA 
North Weymouth 
General Course 

Senior Prom Committee |. 

./ true friend is forever a friend. 



-Bob' 



ARTHUR PARNABY 

North Weymouth "Arturo" "Red" "Rollo" 
Business Course 

Home Room Messenger 1; Football 2; Intra- 
mural Basketball 1, 2; Wrestling 2, 3, 4. 

"He had a head to contrive, a tongue to 
persuade, 

And a hand to execute any mischief." 



DORO l HV PERKINS 

East Weymouth "Dot" 
Business Course 

Basketball 2, 3; Class Dues Collector 3, 4; Gym 
Exhibition 1; Who's Who Committee 4. 

A merry laugh, a twinkling smile, 

Are all that makes the day worth-while. 



STELLA PARSONS 

South Wej mouth "Estelle" 
Classical Course 

Home Room Messenger 1; 4-H Club 1; Glee Club 
1, 2. 3, 4; Orchestra 2, 3, 4; Class History Com- 
mittee 4: Lunchroom Duty 2; Musical Revue 4; 
Operetta 1, 2, 3. 

When will they bring all I dream of to me? 



FRANCES PERKINS 

East Weymouth "Frannie" "Fran" 

Home Economics Course 

Candy Girl at Musical Revue 4; Waitress at Re- 
flector Banquet 2, 3; Lunchroom Duty 1, 2, 3; 
Gym Exhibition 1; Basketball 2, 3, 4; Gradu- 
ation Reception Committee 4. 

Clever and witty, 
Her loss is a pity. 



MALCOLM PARTRIDGE, JR. 

We\ mouth Heights "Mai" 
General Course 

Cross Country 2; Advertising Manager Football 
Souvenir 4. 

"A little work, a little play," 
That's how he likes to pass the day. 



CAROLINE PETERS 

North Weymouth "Carol" 
Business Course 

Freshman-Senior Party Entertainment 1; Gym 
Exhibition 1, 2; Honor Roll i, 2; Reflector Ban- 
quet Entertainment 1; Usher at Senior Play 4. 

Slow to argue, but quick to act. 



LINCOLN PASSERO 

East Weymouth "Lu" "Wolf Junior" 

General Course 

Track Team 4; Intramural Basketball 1, 2, 3. 

A sense of humor is not always an unmixed 
blessing. 



HOW ARD PETERSON 

South Weymouth "Howie" "Pete" 

General Course 

Class History Committee 4; Track 1, 2. 

It is better to arrive late than not at all. 



BRADFORD PATTERSON 

Weymouth Landing "Pat" 
Business Course 

Room Spelling Bee Champion 3, 4; Glee Club 
1, 3: Wrestling 3. 4; Class Outing Committee 3; 
Class Prophecy Committee 4; Operetta 1. 

To be steadfast in purpose is to insure 
success. 



VICTOR PETERSON 

South We\ mouth "Pete" 
Technical Course 

Science Club 3: Junior Party Committee 3; Class 
Motto Committee 4; Gym Team 1, 2, 3. 

One could not ask for a better friend. 



DANA PEASLEE 

South Wey mouth "Wolfe" 
Business Course 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Vice-President 3, President 4; 
Class Nominating Committee 3; Musical Revue 
4; Operetta 2, 3; Senior Christmas Party Enter- 
tainment 4; Senior Prom Committee 4. 

Clothes make the man. 



WILLIAM PIERCE 

North Weymouth "Bill" "Bimbo" 

Technical Course 

Glee Club 2; Safetv Driving Club 4; Science 
Club 3: Senior Christmas Party Committee 4. 

He never gives up pleasure for studies. 



□ " E3 




PAUL 
OUINLAN 



ROBER1 
RAM) 



ROBERT 
R A"* \IONL) 



GEORGE 
REED, JR. 



AGNES 
REIU 



BERNARD 
RE ILLY 



CAROL 
ROBERTS 



IRENE PILLSBURY 

South Weymouth 
Classical Course 

Freshman-Senior Party Entertainment 1; Girls' 
Glee Club 1, 2; Candy Girl at Football Games 
3; Class Clothing Committee 4; Senior Play 4. 

To be self-sufficient is to be truly free. 



ROBERT RAND 

Weymouth Landing "Sally" 

General Course 
Senior Christmas Party Entertainment Com- 
mittee 4; Graduation Reception Committee 4. 

A day off noiv and then does one no harm. 



LAWRENCE PINGREE 

East Weymouth "Larry" 
Business Course 

Cross Country 4: Gym Team 1, 2, 3, 4; Class 
Clothing Committee 4. 

/ haven't taken a book home all week long. 



ROBERT RAYMOND 

South Weymouth "Bud" 

Business Course 
Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Christmas Party Entertainment 
4: Freshman-Senior Party Entertainment 1; Har- 
mony Club 1; Musical Revue r, 4; Orchestra 1, 
2, 3, 4; Student Bandmaster 2, 3, 4; Track Team 
1, 2, 3, 4; Indoor Track 2, 4; Graduation Recep- 
tion Committee 4. 

Our genial bandmaster! May his years roll 
along, 

With the creed that he leaves us, a gay, 
merry song! 



FLORENCE PITTS 

North Weymouth "I" 
Business Course 

Reflector Secretary 4; Student Council 2; Class 
Nominating Committee 3; Girls' Basketball 4; 
Programme Seller at Thanksgiving Day Football 
Game 4. 

Chatter, chatter, from morning till night. 



GEORGE REED, JR. 

South Weymouth "Junie" "Zeke" 

Technical Course 
Student Council 1, 2; Junior Party Committee 3; 
Class History Committee 4. 

"Write me down as one who loves his 
fellow men." 



LUCILLE PLOURDE 

East Wey mouth "Lou" 
Business Course 

Reflector Secretary 4; Room Messenger 2; Usher 
at Senior Play 4. 

Quietness is in itself a virtue. 



AGNES REID 

East Weymouth "Aggie" 

Business Course 
Shorthand Theory Certificate 3; Lunchroom 
Duty 4. 

She is one who deserves the friendship of 
everyone. 



ROBERT PLOURDE 

South Weymouth 
Business Course 



"Bob' 



A quiet person who never seems to be in 
trouble. 



BERNARD REILLY 

South Weymouth 
Technical Course 
Wrestling Team 4. 



"Bernie" 



Behind those glasses, what a man! 



PAUL QUINTAN 

East Weymouth "Qiiinie" 
General Course 

Intramural Basketball 2; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Class 
Banquet Committee 4. 

Why go to school when there is so much 
enjoyment outside? 



CAROL ROBERTS 

Weymouth Landing "Pinke\" 

General Course 
Class Nominating Committee 3: Christmas Party 
Committee 4. 

She's at home on the briny deep. 



□ 8 n 



HERBERT ROBSON, JR. 

North We\ mouth "Fat" 

General Course 
Senior Christmas Play 4: Freshman Football 1; 
Safer) Driving Club 4. 

Not a care in the world! 



GERALD ROGERS 

East Weymouth "Jerry" 

General Course 

Always happy, always gay, 

Going through life the cheerful -way. 



HUBERT RUEL 

South Wevmouth "Skee' 

General Course 
Christmas Party Committee 4: Safety Driving 
Club 4; Senior Play 4. 

We think that he will make a success of his 

life. 



ROBERT SARGENT 

Weymouth Landing "Bob" 

General Course 
Track 1, 4: Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Camera Club 3. 

Paderewski, look out! 



NORMAN SCOTT 

Weymouth Landing "Norm" 

Business Course 
Usher at graduation 3; Class Nominating Com- 
mittee 3; Class Will Committee Chairman 4: 
Football 3. 4; Track 1, 2. 4. Wrestling 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Happ\-go-lucky, everyone's friend, 

Joyous the hours that -with him we spend. 



WILFRED SEVIGNY, JR. 

East Wevmouth "Willie" "Al" 

General Course 
Home Room Messenger 1, 2, 3; Manager of the 
Freshman- Junior Varsity Football Team 1, 2; 
Waterboy of the Varsity 1, 2; Senior Christmas 
Party Entertainment Committee 4. 

One can read a man's character by the ivay 

he treat', his horse. 



WILLIAM SEWALL. 
North Weymouth 
General Course 



[R. 



"Bill" 



Glee ( lull 1, 2, 3, |; Musical Revue 4; Operetta 
1, 2. 3; Ticket Collector at Football Games I, 2, 
3. \: Freshman-Senioi Part) Entertainment 1 ; 
Junior Part) Entertainment 3; Senior Christmas 
Part) Entertainment |: Senioi Prom Committee 
I 

King Solomon in all his glory never was 
arrayed like this. 



HOWARD SHAW 

South Weymouth "Howie" 
General Course 

Camera Club 2, 3, 4, President \; Christinas 
Party Entertainment Committee 4; Football 
Moving Picture Photographer 4. 

Patience is a virtue. 



MARY SHAWLES 

East Weymouth "Gypsie' 
Business Course 

Usher at Musical Revue 4. 

Though she appears to be quiet, 
She is full of good fun. 



RUTH SHEEHY 

East Weymouth "Ruthie" 
Classical Course 

Girls" Glee Club 1; Mixed Glee Club 3; Band 
3, 4; Class Will Committee 4. 



Shy, but not timid. 



ROBERTA SILVA 

South Weymouth "Bert" "Bobby" 

Home Economics Course 

Glee Club 1, 2. 3, 4; Lunchroom Duty 3: Oper- 
etta 1, 2, 3; Musical Revue 4: State Music Fes- 
tival 4; Voice Culture Class 4. 

Domesticity is a virtue beyond price. 



JOHN SLOANE 
East Wevmouth 
General Course 

Clear the -way, here I come. 



a 8 □ 



RALPH STAPLES 

East Weymouth "Ralphie" 

Agricultural Course 
Camera Club 4; Dairy Judging Team 4: Flower 
Judging Team 3; Ticket Collector at Musical 
Rewie 4. 

A good friend is worth having. 



KENNETH SWAN, JR. 

East Weymouth "Skinhead" "Joe" "Soapy" 

General Course 
Football ■>, 3, 4; Tennis 3; Wrestling 2. 

For men are but boys grown. 



HERBERT STARR 
Weymouth Landing 
Agricultural Course 
A quiet lad, but a good friend. 



"Herby' 



SYLVIA STEELE 

We\ mouth Heights 

Classical Course 
Four-Year Honor Roll; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; French 
Club 4; Class Outing Committee 3; Senior Christ- 
mas Party Entertainment 4; Library Assistant 2; 
Lunchroom Dim 2. 3; Reflector Staff 3, Editor- 
in-Chief 4: Student Council Assistant 2; Student 
Council 3, 4, Secretary 4; Candy Girl at Teachers' 
Play 3; Assistant Editor of the Student Council 
Handbook 3. 

An eye that sees, a mind that saves, 
A ready wit her future paves. 



JEANNETTE STONE 

South Weymouth 
Business Course 

Student Council Assistant 1; Girls' Glee Club i, 
2, 3; Senior Prom Committee 4. 

Always cheerful, always gay, 
Why can't we all be that way? 



BARBARA STONELY 

East Weymouth "Barbie" 

Classical Course 
Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Operetta 2, 3; Class Dues 
Collector 3, 4; Class History Committee 4; Girls' 
Track 2; Candv Girl at Teachers' Play 3; 
Christmas Party Entertainment 4; Reflector 
Staff 4. 

She possesses an air and grace by no means 
common. 



RUTH STUB 

East Weymouth "Stubby" 
Classical Course 

Candy Girl at Teachers' Play; Class Nominating 
Committee 4; Who's W T ho Committee 4; Student 
Council r, 2, 3, Secretary 3; Four Year Honor 
Roll; Lunchroom Duty 1, 2, 3; Lunchroom Cash- 
ier 2, 3, 4: Honorary Member Monday Club 4; 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Operetta 1, 2; Home Room 
Messenger 2, 3; Waitress at Reflector Banquet 2, 
3; Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 3. 



She's as mighty as can be, 
In the hearts of all who see. 



ELIZABETH SWEENEY 

Weymouth Landing "Betty" 

Classical Course 
Class Outing Committee 4. 

Business before pleasure— or is it vice versa? 



SHIRLEY SYLVESTER 

East Weymouth "Shirl" 

Business Course 
Girls' Glee Club 1; Lunchroom Duty 3, 4; Gregg 
Transcription Certificate for 80 words a minute 
4; Waitress at Reflector Banquet 2, 3. 

Variety is the spice 0/ life. 



MURIEL SYME 
South Weymouth 
Business Course 

Behind those sparkling eyes? 



"Mcr' 



JOHN TANGUY 

North Weymouth "Jackie' 
Business Course 
Class Will Committee 4; Wrestling Team 4. 

Girls! Girls! They all fight over me! 



BERYL THOMAS 
East Weymouth 
Business Course 

Usher at Musical Revue 4. 



'Tommy" 



She has personality which is wry hard to 
beat. 




□ 



DOROTHY 
I HOMAS 



I HOM VS 
I HOMPSON 



M UULYN 
TITUS 



WILLIAM 
TORMEY 



JOHN 
TOWER 



MARJOIE 
TRAFfON 



THYRA 
1 HORN BERG 



MARY 
TURNER 



NORMA 
TURNER 



MARY 
TWOMEY 



M ARJORIE 
TORREY 



PAULINE 
VENTRE 



g2 n 



T3 



DOROTHY THOMAS 

South Weymouth "Dot tie" "Peewee" 
Business Course 

Class Motto Committee 4: Gregg Transcription 
Certificate 60 words a minute 3; Gregg Tran- 
scription Certificate for 80 words a minute 4. 

Her friendly personality makes her many 
acquaintances. 



JOHN TOWER 
Fast Weymouth 
General Cotusc 



"CuebaW 



■Gypsy' 



Football 1. 2. 3, |; Senior Prom Committee \. 
The epitomization of the strong, silent man. 



THOMAS THOMPSON 

South Weymouth 
Technical Course 

"Speech is silver; silence is golden.' 



'Tom' 



MARJORIE TRAFTON 

East Weymouth 
Business Course 

Class Banquet Committee 4. 



'Margie' 



School bores her, but she never forgets her 
dates. 



THYRA THORNBERG 

East Weymouth "Thea" 
Business Course 

Honor Roll 1; Home Room Spelling Bee Cham- 
pion 1; Yollevball 1: Basketball 1; Reflector 
Staff 4; Gregg Transcription Certificate for 60 
words a minute 3: 80 words a minute 4; 100 
words a minute 4; Class Outing Committee 4. 

Her quiet manner causes us to wonder. 



MARY TURNER 

Weymouth Landing 
Business Course 

// silence is valuable, 
She's a millionaire. 



MARILYN TITUS 
North We\ mouth 
Business Course 

Reflector Staff; Gregg Shorthand Theory Cer- 
tificate 3; Gregg Transcription Certificate 60 
words a minute 3; Gregg Transcription Cer- 
tificate So words a minute 4; Gregg Transcrip- 
tion Certificate 100 words 4. 

What would P. J. do -without her? 



WILLIAM TORMEY 
Weymouth Landing 
Business Course 

Football 3, 4. 

B. C.'s new coach! 



•Bill' 



NORMA TURNER 

North Weymouth "Norm" 
Business Course 

Winthrop High School: Gym 1, 2. 3; Orchestra 
1: Art 1, 2, 3: Glee Club 2, 3. 

Her sparkling eyes have woti us all. 



MARY TWOMEY 
South Weymouth 
Classical Course 

French Club 3. 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Operetta 
1, 2, 3: Musical Re\ tie 4: Re/lector Staff 4; 
Freshman-Senior Party Entertainment 1: Senior 
Christmas Part) Entertainment 4; Class Prophe- 
cy Committee \. 

Among her many attributes a kind heart is 
not the least. 



MARJORIE TORREY 

South Weymouth "Margie" "Midgie" 

Business Course 

Gregg Theor) Certificate 3; Gregg Transcription 
Certificate for 60 words a minute 3; 80 words a 
minute 4; 100 words a minute 4; Student 
Council Assistant 1; Volleyball 1. 

Her friendly smile and pleasant air 
Quickly beguile the unaware. 



PAULINE VENTRE 

East Weymouth "Polly" "Shorty" 

Business Course 

Glee Club 1. 2, 3; Girls' Glee Club 1. 2: Operetta 



She is little in size, but quite wise. 



□ 93 n 



CLINTON VINCENT 

East Weymouth "Clint" "Vinnie" 

Business Course 

Safety Driving Club 4. 

Here's to our future naval designer! 



ROBERT WALSH 

North Weymouth 
General Course 



"Pop' 



Reflector Art Staff 3; Class Will Committee 4; 
Wrestling 3; Intramural Basketball 2. 

Rube Goldberg— that's he! 



MARGARET WOLFE 
North Weymouth 

Business Cou isc 



"Daisy" "Margie' 



Honoi Roll 1; Home Room Spelling Champion 
1, 3; Junior Nominating Committee 3; Student 
Council Assistant 2, 3; Gregg Theory Certificate 
3; Gregg Transcription Certificate for 60 words 
a minute 3; 80 words a minute 4. 

She combines a business-like air with a jolly 
friendliness. 



MELBA WOOD 

East Weymouth "Mel" "Mickey" 

Business Course 

Gregg Transcription Certificate for 80 words a 
minute 4. 

She has much laughter in her conversations. 



KIRBV WEATHERSBY 

East Weymouth "A'. P." 

Technical Course 

Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 2, 3; De- 
bating Club 1, 2. 3: Science Club 3: Reflector 
Staff 2. 3. 4; junior Party Committee 3: Who's 
Who Committee 4: Band 3, 4; Chemistry Lab- 
oratory Assistant 4; Musical Revue 4; Debating 
Team 3: Senior Play 4. 

Always in a rush to reach his destination. 



GERTRUDE WOODIS 

Weymouth Landing "Gert" 
Business Course 

Gregg Shorthand Certificate for 60 words a 
minute 3: Gregg Shorthand Complete Theory 
Certificate 3; Gregg Shorthand Certificate for 80 
words a minute 4: Gregg Shorthand Certificate 
for 100 words a minute (.; Class Outing Commit- 
tee 3; Reflector Staff 4; Student Council Assist- 
ant \: Graduation Reception Committee 4. 

On skates she's a whiz. 



DOROTHY WELLS 

Weymouth Heights "Dot" 
Classical Course 

French Club 3. 4; French Club Play 3: Vice- 
President of French Club 4: Girls' Glee Club 1; 
Junior Decorating Committee 3: Reflector Stall 
2, 3, 4; Exchange Editor of Reflector 4; Usher at 
Marionette Show 3; Senior Play 4. 

She has a natural wise sincerity, a simple 
truthfulness. 



JAMES WOOTEN 

East Wevmouth "fiiiimx" "Cab" 

Classical Course 

Class Nominating Committee 3. |: Assistant 
Baseball Manager 3: Manager 4: Football Man- 
ager 2, 3. 4; Lunchroom Dutv 2: Room Messen- 
ger 1; Student Council Assistant 2: Class Ban- 
quet Committee 4. 

Cabby's known by his -whiffle and his sneeze. 



MARJORIE WILKIE 

East Weymouth "Margie 
Classical Course 

To be truly happy, is to be content. 



MERLE WORKMAN 

East Wevmouth 
Classical Course 

Honor Roll 2: Class Will Committee 4: Class 
Dues Collector 3. 4; Usher at Teachers' Play 3: 
Gym Exhibition 1. 

Her mind is quick. 
Her wit is keen. 

Her equal we have seldom seen. 



ELLA WINTERMEYER 

Weymouth Landing "Windy" "El" 

Business Course 

Spanish Club 4: Gregg Shorthand Certificate for 

80 words a minute 4. 

Always ready to lend a helping hand. 



IRENE WYSOCKI 

North Weymouth "Renee" "I" 

Business Course 

Safet) Driving Club |: Spanish Club \. 

One who is never -without a merry smile. 



ANTHONY YANMZZI 
East Weymouth 
General Course 



"Butch" 



Football 3. 

"Serious?' 



It's not in his vocabulary. 



W ALLACE C. BABIN 
Weymouth Landing 
Cahinetmaking 

Musical Revue 4; Senior Play 4. 
A man of few words. 



■ Wally' 



EUGENE YOUNG 

East Weymouth "Gene" "Eli" 

Technical Course 

Debating Club 2, 3; Radio Club 2; Science 2; 
Aviation Club 4; Track Team 2; Tennis Team 1; 
Intramural Baseball 2; Orchestra 2, 3, 4. 

Music hath charm. 



ROBERT J. BLAISDELL 

North Weymouth "Bob" 
Printing 

Who's Who Committee 4; Trade School Ex- 
hibition r, 2. 

Nothing is impossible to a willing heart. 



JOSEPH ZEOLIE 

Weymouth Landing 
General Course 



"Joe' 



A quiet lad, content to let the world roll by. 



HARRY W. BLAKEMAN, JR. 

Whitman "Junie" "Blakie" 

Printing 

Baseball 2, 4; Basketball 2, 4; Senior Prom Com- 
mittee 4; Trade School Exhibition 2, 4; Oper- 
etta 2. 

We have a singer in our midst. 



ERANK X. BARCELLOS 

East Weymouth "Frankie" 
Sheet Metal 

Nominating Committee 4; Trade School Exhibi- 
tion 4. 

An honest man's word is as good as his 
bond. 



HENRY E. BRENNOCK 

Cohasset "Henny" 
Auto Repair 

Baseball 1, 2, 4; Trade School Exhibition 1, 2, 4. 



A man that blushes is not quite a brute. 



PARKER W. BATES 

Whitman "Parky" "Sonny" 

Printing 

Four-Year Honor Roll; Class President 4; Foot- 
ball 2, 4: Baseball 1, 2, 4: Basketball 1, 2, 4; 
Senior Class Pla\ 4; Home Room Messenger 1, 
2; Trade School Exhibition 1, 2, 4; Class Motto 
Committee j; Who's Who Committee 4. 

A fine fellow who does everything exceed- 
ingly well. 



EDWARD W. COBBETT, JR. 

Rockland "Zeke" 
Auto Repair 

Trade School Exhibition 1, 2, 4; Who's Who 
Committee y, Class History Committee 4. 

Full of joke and jest. 



WILTON T. BATES 

Whitman "Willy" 
Auto Repair 

Basketball 2, 4; Baseball 2. 4; Senior Christmas 
Party Committee j.; Tiade School Exhibition 1, 
2, 4. 

Never worry; it doesn't pay 



HARRY J. CRONIN 

East Weymouth "Harry" 
Cahinetmaking 

Class Will 4; Musical Revue 4: Senior Play 4; 
Trade School Exhibition 1, 4; Band 1, 2, 4. 

Quiet, but efficient. 



DANIEL F. KEEGAN, JR. 

Weymouth "Danny" 
Printing 

Trade School Exhibition 1, 2. 4; Class "Will Com- 
mittee 4. 

Silence is golden but Danny doesn't want 
to be rich. 



WARREN S. PEARSON 

South Weymouth "Warren 
Cabinetmaking 

Band 1, 2, 4; Class History Committee 4. 
Never trouble trouble. 



EDMUND H. KELLEY 

Weymouth "Kel" "Eddie" 

Printing 

Trade School Exhibition 1, 2; Senior Christmas 
Party Committee 4: Baseball 1, 2, 4; Basket- 
ball 1, 2, 4; Football 2, 4. 

A real sport in everything. 



WILLIAM R. PIZZI 

East Weymouth "Tiger" "Bill" 

Sheet Metal 

Football 2, 4; Wrestling 2, 4; Trade School 
Basketball 4; Baseball 4; Graduation Reception 
Committee 4. 

Quite the boy. 



JOHN R. MACONOCHIE, JR. 

North Weymouth "Mac" "Jiggs" 

Sheet Metal 

Graduation Reception Committee 4; Basketball 
\: Baseball 4. 

A firm believer in the maxim, 'Better late 
than never. 



ROBERT R. REED 

East Braintree "Ezra" 
Auto Repair 

Trade School Exhibition 1, 2, 4; Class Prophecy 
Committee 4. 

Happy am I! From care I'm free. 
Why aren't they all content like me? 



GEORGE A. MAYNE 

North Weymouth "Georgie" 
Printing 

Trade School Exhibition 1. 2; Baseball Manager 
4- 

What's the use of -worrying? 



DONALD F. SCHULTZ 

North Weymouth "Don 

Sheet Metal 
Graduation Reception Committee 4. 

Work will hurt no man. 



LOUIS McIYER 

Rockland "Mac" 
Auto Repair 

Trade School Exhibition 1, 2, 4; Nominating 
Committee 4. 

4 friend indeed. 



WALTER C. SHURTLEFF 

Rockland "Shurty" 
Auto Repair 

Who's Who Committee 4; Trade School Exhibi- 
tion 2, 4. 

Smart— when he wants to be. 



LEONARD H. NADELL 

North Weymouth "Lenny" 

Sheet Metal 
Basketball 1. 4; Class Secretary-Treasurer 4; 
Class Will Committee 4. 

A gentleman at all times. 



NORMAN J. STEVENSON 

North Weymouth "Stevie" "Joe" 

Printing 

Trade School Exhibition 1. 2; Class History 
Committee 4. 

We know a worker by his work. 



H99E3 



CHARLES CULLIVAN, JR. 

East Weymouth "Saint" 
Sheet Metal 

Senior Prom Committee 4; Wrestling a, 4. 

Why worry when the future takes care 
of itself? 



DANIEL J. FLAVELL 

Rockland "Dan" 
Cabinetmaking 

Nominating Committee, 4. 

When he blushes, look out, girls, 



JOHN H. DAVIDSON, JR. 

East Weymouth "Johnny' 
Printing 



"Mousy' 



Trade School Exhibition 1, 2, 4. 

Please don't rush me. I've got all the time 
in the world. 



COLIN C. GILLIS 

Hull "Gill" 
Cabinetmaking 

Vice-President 4; Baseball 4; Football 2, 4. 

Easy come, easy go. 



PETER A. DUNCAN, JR. 

Weymouth "Pete" "Dunk" 

Printing 

Class Outing Committee 4; Trade School Ex- 
hibition 1, 2, 4. 

Why study when sleep is so dear? 



DONALD A. GREEN 
Weymouth Landing 
Cabinetmaking 

Outing Committee 4; Band 1, 2. 

I'm the master of my fate, 
The captain of my soul. 



"Mayor" 



ROBERT B. DUNCAN 

Rockland "Bob" 
Auto Repair 

Trade School Exhibition 1, 2, 4; Graduation 
Banquet Committee 4. 

Why can't women let me clone? 



EDWARD M. HART, JR. 

East Weymouth "Ed 
Sheet Metal 

Class Will 4; Tiade School Exhibition 2, 4. 

Thinking is but an idle waste of thought. 



WILLIAM J. ELLIS 

South Weymouth "Bill" "Willie" 

Printing 

Class Prophecy Committee 4; Trade School Ex- 
hibition 1, 2, 4; Home Room Messenger 2, 4. 

"His friends— he has many; 
His foes— has he any?" 



DENNIS R. HERLIHY, JR. 

East Weymouth "Dinny" 
Sheet Metal 

Basketball 1, 2, 4; Trade School Exhibition 1, 2. 
Let not your heart be troubled. 



WILLIAM D. FADER 

Abington "Bill" "Willie" 

Printing 

Student Council 2, 4; Trade School Exhibition 
1, 2, 4; Class Nominating Committee 4. 



Of course, I'm right. 



FRANK E. HILTON 
Weymouth Landing 
Auto Repair 

Trade School Exhibition r, 2, 4. 



'Sag" 



"Slow but steady wins the race. 



n 01 □ 



PIERCE A. TATREAU 
South Weymouth 
Sheet Metal 



"Pie 



Never let school stand in the way of 
pleasure. 



ELDON TUTTLE 

East Weymouth "Dunny" "Tut" 

Sheet Metal 

Class Prophecy Committee 4; Who's Who Com- 
mittee 4; Trade School Exhibition 1, 4. 

Ready, willing and able. 



JAMES X. VANASSE 

Weymouth Landing "Van" 

Sheet Metal 

Basketball 1; Baseball 1, 2, 4; Who's Who Com- 
mittee 4; Band 1 , 2. 

A little woik, a little play, not much home 

work,— a perfect day. 



JOSEPH F. WOLFE 

East Weymouth "Joe" 
Auto Repair 

Calm, cool, and collected. 

□ a 



n 102 E3 




ACTIVITIES 



First Row: E. Gaskill, B. Stonely, M. Twomey, Mr. Brown, A. Gardner, S. Steele, V. Garrity, H. Burke, 
D. Wells, J. Condon. M. O'Donnell; Second Row: H. Cromwell, V. Collins. B. Whitehad, E. Pitts. G. Woodis, 
A. McCarthy, J. Connell, L. Plourde, D. O'Connor, M. Nickerson; Third Row: M. Hayes, C. O'Neil 
I. Hosmer, C. Anderson, T. Thornberg, A. Dublin E. Dowd, M. Leonard, S. Hart, C. Cote; Fourth Row: 
M. Titus, M. Donahue, L. Doane, P. Feist, V. Olson, P. Clain, A. Toomey, M. Gerrior, E. Corbo, Rosemary 
Hurd, M. Mooney. 



^ HE Staff of the Reflectoi has concluded its duties for the school year of 
1940-1941. During this time five issues, the Thanksgiving, Christmas, Valentine, 
the April issue, and the Year Book, were printed in the Weymouth Vocational 
School. We have endeavored to have the publications reflect the best thoughts 
and ideas of all the pupils by choosing the highest grade materials offered from 
all classes. We hope our efforts have provided the students with an interesting 
and varied magazine. 

The regular meeting's ol the Southeastern Massachusetts League of School 
Publications have been attended by members of our staff. The meetings of the 
League this year have been held at Milton, Abington, Attleboro and Duxbury. 

We of the Reflector staff wish to thank our faculty adviser, Mr. Prescott B. 
Brown for his helpful advice and his untiring service. We are grateful to our 
teachers for their assistance and to the students for their willing co-operation. We 
also wish to thank Mr. Harry F. Duncan, printing instructor, for his ever-ready 
aid. 

In leaving, we wish to extend to the staff of next year's Reflector our best 
wishes for success and the hope that all will find in their work the pleasure and 
benefit we have found in ours. 





First Row: S. Steele. A. Gardner, C. Anderson, L. Jannell, E. Rtgan, N. Phillips, B. Hill, S. Gately, M. 
Gately; Second Row: \V. Meara, G. Gilligan, A. Bakish, J. Larner, M. Mitchell. J. MacDougall, F. Pierce, 
J. Barker, R. Gibson; Third Row: C. Gillis, R. Pierce, F. Smith, R. Crawford, E. McGall, R. Cheney, 
L. Nadell. 



Student Council 

HE Student Council of Weymouth High School consists of the regular mem- 
bers voted upon by the students of Weymouth High and the assistant members 
who are elected from each home room. The officers of 1940-41 are: 

John Delorey, President 
Alphonse Bakish, Vice-President 
Sylvia Steele, Secretary 

The duty of the Student Council is to keep order throughout the school, in 
the lunchroom, on the school grounds, and in the corridors. By having an efficient 
Student Council body, Weymouth High is able to have a well developed system 
of order. 

This year the Student Council held a very successful Victory Dance on De- 
cember 6, 1940. 

May our Weymouth High Student Council prove more successful with each 
succeeding year.! 




Musical Revue 



N February 21, 1941 the members of the various musical organizations of 
Weymouth High School presented a "Musical Revue" under the direction of Mr. 
John M. Lyons and Mr. James W. Calderwood- The Weymouth High School 
Band, Orchestra, and Glee Club offered selections as well as many talented mem- 
bers of the High School student body. 



THE PROGRAMME 



Part I 



March— "Golden Victory" John T. Ghiorse 
Norman D. Loud 
Overture— "Migonnette" Baumann 

Weymouth High School Band 
Trumpet Duet— "The Pals" Barnard 
Robert Raymond and Bowen Buckman 
with Band 

Accordion Solo— "Accordiana" Magnante 

Joseph Spinella 
Clarinet Solo— "Soinnambula" Art. Thornton 

George Gloster 



Overture— "Lustspiel" Kela Bela 

Weymouth High School Orchestra 

Song— "Jeanie" Foster 

Weymouth High School Glee Club 
Song— "Why Do I Love You" Kern 
Marion Leonard, Martha Gerrior, Doris 
Goodwin, Alice St. Peter, Roy Monroe, Dana 
Peaslee, William Sewell, Donald Taylor. 
Toe Tap Dance 

Ann Parker 
Song— "Heaven Enters Through My Window" 
Preston DcPlacido 
Patricia Maddox and Glee Club John Lyons 



Violin Solo— "Czardas" Monti 

Mary Pottle 
Vocal Solo— "A Heart That Is Free" Robyn 

' Mary Twomey 
Piano Solo— "Prelude in C Sharp Minor" 

Rachmaninoff 

Shirley Hart 
Chorus— "Dear Land of Home" Sibelius 
Chorus — "Mariquita" Marzo 
Weymouth High School Glee Club 



Part II 



Kern 



Song-'Bill" 

Stella Parsons 
Buck and Wing Dance 

Alice Langford and Marilyn Buchan 
Song— "Ol' Man River" Kern 

Albert Nash and Glee Club 
Selection— Popular Melodies Arranged 

John Hoflman's Swing Band 
Chorus— "God Bless America Berlin 
Roberta Silva, Jessie Church, 
Lorraine Casciani 
Miss America, Betty Fahey 
Ensemble and Orchestra 



H 108 □ 




First Row: J. Ireland, W. Blair, D. Wells, H. Burke, C. French, W. Meara, B. Fahey; Second Row: J. O'Con- 
nor, A. Gardner, M. Briggs, I. Pillsbury, P. Bates; Third Row: E. Byrne. H. Ruel K. Weathersby. 



Senior Play 



N May 23, 1941, under (he direction of Miss Ernestine Canning, the mem- 
bers of the Senior Class presented the delightful comedy, "What A Life", by Clif- 
ford Goldsmith. The play itself concerns the trials and troubles of the famous 
Henry Aldrich at Central High School. Henry finds himself in many difficulties 

because of his desire to go to the annual Spring Dance with the attractive Barbara 
Pearson. Accused of cheating, expelled from school, and even arrested for stealing 

the school band instruments, Henry is certainly the victim of great misunder- 
standings. 

The part of Henry Aldrich was played very humorously and entertainingly 
by Kirbv Weathersby. Betty Fahey was the attractive and popular Barbara Pear- 
son. Parker Bates, as George Bigelow. was Henry's outstanding rival. The many 
supporting players handled their parts excellently. 

THE CAST 



Henry Aldrich Kirby Weathersby 

Barbara Pearson Betty Fahey 

George Bigelow Parker Bates 

Mrs. Aldrich Eleanor French 

Mr. Nelson Walter Blair 

Miss Shea Margaret Morrill 

Mr. Bradley John O'Connor 

Mr. Patterson Hubert Ruel 



Bill Edward Byrne 

Miss Eggleston Dorothy Wells 

Miss Johnson Helen Cromwell 

Miss Wheeler Ann Gardner 

Mr. Vecclisto William Meara 

Detective Ferguson Henry Burke 

Mary Irene Pillsbury 

Gertie Jeanette Ireland 



Miss Pike Mary Briggs 

Students: Ethel Brennan, Barbara Batchelder. Marilyn Nickerson. Mar) 
Twomey, Malcolm Duffee, Richard Goodwin, William Leary and Vincent Harper. 



□ '°9 n 



First Row: E. Pratt, F. Minasian, M. Pottle, S. Parsons, F. Thomas, P. MacDonitd, B. Knapp; Second 
Row: G. Gloster, R. Sargent, A. Loud, E. Young, W. Lang, YV. Kosarick; Third Row: A. Laneau, K. Mac- 
Leod, R. Raymond, B. Buckman, C. Galligan. 

Orchestra 



HE Weymouth High School Orchestra, under the able direction of Mr. James 
W. Calderwood, has played for several important occasions this year. They opened 
their season by playing for the Monday Club Play. They also rendered selections 
between the acts of the W. H. S. Senior Play. 

The members of the orchestra express their hope for a successful season next 
year. 




n 110 □ 




First Row: A. Loud, H. Roach, W. Parson, R. Laramie, J. Hull, R. Sheehy, P. McCarthy, F. Halbert, 
Second Row: E. Dorn, R. Raymond, M. Briggs. W. McLean, V. Collins , D. Knight, R. Bloom, M. Mitchell, 
J. Hoffman, P. Dodge, P. Mavne, R. LeClair. R. Shepherd, M. Leonard. G. Gloster, S. Steele, B. Foley, E. Fay; 
Third Row: K. Weathersby, H. Cronin, R Walsh. L. Nash, R. Holbrook, D. Green, W. Black, J. Hill, B. 
Buckman. K. MacLeod, M. Roberts, F. Minasian, R. Nelson, F. Parsons, H. Ruud, R. Newell, A. Laneau. 



Band 

HE Band, under the direction of Mr. James Calderwood and Mr. John 
Ghiorse, was present at all the football games this year, both at home and in other 
towns. At these games the band formed the letters of both home and opposing 
teams. 

This \ear the drum major was Majorie Leonard, assisted by Edna Fay and 
Edith Dorne. The officers of 1940-41 were: 

Student Band Master, Robert Raymond 
Secretary, Sylvia Steele 

As part of the Memorial exercises in the W. H. S. hall the band played 
under the direction of Mr. James Calderwood. The selections were "The Star- 
Spangled Banner" and "America". 

At the graduation exercises the Senior Class will sing "Sylvia" and "I Am 
An American," accompanied by the band. 

The members of the band wish to extend their thanks and gratitude to Mr. 
Calderwood, a great music master. 



□ 1 n 



Kirst Row: Wheeler. Council, Rakish, Penetta, Co-Captain CJ. Delorey, Co-Captain Nista, I'izzi, Drake, Bates; 
Second Row: Chiinlan, McKinnon. Assistant Coach Icradi. Coach Arlanson. Cavallo, Jackson; Third Row: 
Bailey, Scott, (lillis. Swan, Tower, Hcarn, Tormcy, Brown; Fourth Row: Manager Wooten, J. Delory, Kelly, 
Ahlstrom, Manager LaRocco. 

Football 

JK HIS year's football team mighl well be ranked with the best football teams 
that Weymouth ever put on the field. Under the able coaching of Mr. Harry 
Arlanson, and the capable leadership of co-captains Doin Nista and George 
Delorey, Weymouth swept to an undefeated, untied season climaxed with a 45-0 
victory over our ancient and honorable rivals, Hingham. The team was awarded 
a plaque emblematic of the Eastern Mass. Class C football championship by the 
sportswriters of Boston and each player received gold footballs. The citizens of 
Weymouth, in recognition <>l their superior play and sportsmanship, awarded the 
members ol the team with a trip to Washington. 

The members ol the first team were: co-captains Dom Nista and George 
Delorey. Al Bakish, Bill Council, Jim Panetta, Warren "Hop" McKinnon, Jim 
Wheeler, Frank Cavallo, Parker Bates, Bill Pi//i, and Don Drake. The manager 
was fames Wooten. 

The record: 



Weymouth 


14 


Norwood 


7 


Weymouth 


33 


Swampscott 





Weymouth 


26 


Belmont 


7 


Weymouth 


20 


North Quincy 


6 


Weymouth 


•4 


Brookline 





Weymouth 


14 


Quincy 





Weymouth 


20 


Braintree 


6 


Weymouth 


12 


Dedham 





Weymouth 


34 


Plymouth 


7 


Weymouth 


45 


Hingham 






n 112 □ 




First Row: R. Mcintosh, Mgr., W. Quinlan, C. Christopher, L. Ambler, C. Breton, R. Crawford; Second 
Row: R. Cote, K. Clark, P. Herlihy, Mgr.., Coach Gannon, R. Mahoney, Mgr., W. MacDonald, J. Fitzpatrick. 



Basketball 

/T? \ LTHOUGH this years basketball team was not quite up to Coach Gan- 
non's usual standard, it was a team to be highly regarded by it's South Shore op- 
ponents. The two high sports in the season were the victories over our arch rival 
Hingham. 

The record: 



Brockton 


28 


Weymouth 


26 


L- nn Classical [8 


Weymouth 


18 


Rockland 


4' 


Weymouth 


29 


Weymouth 


-~ 


North Quincy 


2 1 


Brain ree 


2 7 


Weymouth 


2 2 


Weymouth 


3 2 


Hingham 


26 


North Quinc) 


•7 


Weymouth 


•5 


Quinc 5 


26 


Weymouth 


■9 


Milton 


40 


Weymouth 


26 


Abington 


36 


Weymouth 


24 


Rockland 


33 


Weymouth 


15 


Weymouth 


36 


Abinsrton 




25 


Weymouth 


26 


Weymouth 


2 2 


Quincy 


27 


Weymouth 


26 


Braintree 


41 


Weymouth 


26 



□ a 



First Row: Quirk. Slieehan, \oungholm; Second Row: Christopher. Quinlan, Cavallo, McKinnon, Panetta, 
Dentino; Third Row: Coridan, Nista, Connell, Coach Arlanson, Chamherlin, Wheeler, Cheney; Fourth Row: 
Whittle, Manager, Wooten, Manager. 



Baseball 

HE baseball team to date lias had an ofT-and -on season, showing flashes of 
greatness and periods when the) are not so good. Capt. "Hop" McKinnon, while 
alternating between second base and shortstop, has proved the live wire of the 
team, and is attempting to instill the spirit which will bring the team over the 
.500 mark for the year. 

The retold lo dale: 



Weymouth 


6 


Brockton 


2 


Braintree 


•> i 


We) mouth 


7 


Quincv 


1 2 


Weymouth 




Braintree 


1 


Weymouth 


o 


Weymouth 


>4 


Hingham 


3 


Weymouth 


20 


Norl h Quin< y 


3 


\\'c\ mouth 


l 5 


Oninc \ 


5 


Milton 


'3 


Weymouth 


5 


Braintree 


1 2 


We) mouth 


o 



□ "4H 



First Row: K. Durant Pecoraro, Desmond. Pizzi. P. Clifford, Lysakowski, Scott; Second Row Reillv Hear 
Captain Drake, Coach Kelly, Ouellet, Clark, Gifford, Manager. 



Wrestling 





\J\J EYMOl I H S wrestling team swept to its third consecutive state champi- 
onship at the annual Tufts Tournament this year, by the narrow margin of one 
point over Needham. 

This was the first year that Mr. Kelly had taken over the coaching assign- 
ment, since Mr. Stewart had given up the job after a long and successful career. 
Mr. Kelly certainly deserves notice for his excellent job. 

The state champions from Weymouth in their classes are: 
R. Lysakowski— i 23 lb. 
J. Clark— 135 lb. 
W. Pizzi— 145 lb. 

The record: 

Milton Academy 25 .. Weymouth 8 

Weymouth 32 Belmont 10 

Weymouth 19 Quincy 18 

Weymouth 31 Belmont 13 

Haverhill 26 Weymouth 16 

Needham 20 Weymouth 1 1 

Weymouth 24 Quincy 13 

Cranston, R. I. 23 Weymouth 6 

Needham 22 Weymouth 1 1 




First Row: T. Dutson, G. Mnhoney, iff. Harrington, R. Parks, R. Lang; Second Row: S. Gillman, R. Gris- 
dale, F. Halbert. 



Boys' Tennis 



R. Rates was pleased to (list over thai more than half of his team were 
veterans from last year. Eighl matt lies were scheduled and played din ing this 
year. The rival schools included Stituaie. Milton. Quincy, North Quinrv, and 
Hingham. The memhers ol the team are as follows: 

T. Dutson R. Lang 

G. Mahoney S. Gillman 

M. Harrington R. Grisdale 

R. Parks F. Halbert 



n 116 □ 



Floor: Robertson, MacDougall; First Row: Ahlstrom, Connell, Smith, Johnson, MacDonald, Raymond, Hughes, 
Cook, Rubbo; Second Row: Pratt, Passero, Morrison, Brooks, LaRocco, Coach Page, MacAlpine, Ouellet, 
Stria.no; Third Row: Mitchell, N. LaMontagne, A. LaMontagne, Shepherd, Loud, Francis, Cohen. 



Track 



^^^EYMOUTH'S Track Team, under the able tutelage of Mr. Page, enjoyed 
one of its most successful seasons in recent years. 

The indoor track team had a record of four victories and one defeat, having 
gained victories over Roslindale, Milton, Cambridge Latin and Dedham. It's 
one loss was. suffered at the hands of Huntington Prep. School. In the State 
Meet, Weymouth scored the largest number of points ever scored by a Weymouth 
team— 7 points- In the Northeastern Meet, Weymouth relay team won, and also 
in the same meet Tom Smith of Weymouth equalled the meet record for the 50 yd. 
dash. All told, six new high school records were made during the indoor track 
season: 

50 yd. dash Tom Smith— 5.6 sec. 

40 yd. dash Tom Smith— 4.8 sec. 

300 yd. run Eugene Johnson— 35.4 sec. 

300 yd. run Joseph Hughes— 35.4 sec. 

600 yd. run Joseph MacDonald— 1 min., 21.3 sec. 

Relay team, 12 laps— 2 min., 22.3 sec. 

Relay team, 1 1 laps— 2 min-, 32.6 sec. 

During the Spring Season Weymouth's track record shows three victories as 
against two defeats with Weymouth winning the South Shore Meet. 

Mr. Page is very pleased with the results of this year's team and hopes that 
next year's team will be just as successful. 

E3 



Kirst Row: MacOonald. Rubbo, Cook, Coach Page, Youngholm. Levans, Peirce, Manager; Second Row: G. 
Slack, Strothern, Pingree, Page, Sloat, Sheehy, Johnson, G. Slack, Norwood. 

Cross Country 

MOUTH'S Cross Country squad, under the wise direction of Mr. Page, 
lived up to the record set by other track teams as it swept through marred by 
only one defeat. 

Cross County is scored so that the team with the lowest number of points 

wins. 

The Record: 

Weymouth 25 Rockland 35 

Weymouth 21 W'ellesley 34 

Weymouth 12 Canton 43 

Brockton 19 Weymouth 37 

Weymouth 27 Quincy 28 



n - 8 n 




First Row: H. Hill, J. Caruso, M. Harrington, M. LaRocco, \Y. Billings; Second Row: P. Herlihy, J. Flynn. 



Golf 

HE Golf team, after a rather shaky start, is trying hard to climb out of its 
current standing of fifth place in the Norfolk County High School League. They 
have played more than ten games. 

The Record: 



Weymouth fi 


Quincy 


3 


Needham g 


Weymouth 





Needham 8i/ 2 


We) mouth 


v% 


North Quincy b' 


Weymouth 


3 


North Quincy 7 


Weymouth 


2 


Walpole 9 


Weymouth 





Weymouth S 


Norwood 


1 


Weymouth 71/2 


Norwood 




Canton 9 


Weymouth 





Canton 9 


Weymouth 






n "9Q 




First Row: E. Fay, F. Perkins, A. Duplin, E. Pitts, D. Leeming; Second Row: J. Blanchard, B. Lohnes, 



Girls' Sports 

HIS year the girls began their various athletic activities with keen interest. 
The sport that gained the greatest recognition with the girls was basketball. 
The teams were divided into their various classes according to their year. 

Volleyball attracted more girls this year than previous year. The games 
were exciting even to the spectators. 

The juniors and seniors played indoor basketball against the sophomore 
team. The upperclassmen easily overtook the sophomores because of their past 
experience in playing. 

The last event of the girls' sports was a track meet in June. It proved a very 
interesting meet, with many new records made. 




□ 20 a 



D. Leeming, E. Regan, E. Gould, M. Dizer, M. Jlitchell, I. Savery, F. Wilder, E. Vanasse. 



Girls' Tennis 



LARGE enthusiastic group turned out for the girls' tennis team this 
year. Miss Peterson, the new coach, has taught the girls some new angles of the 
game. The matches were played at Braintree, Scituate, and Hingham. The 
members of the team include: 

E. Gould E. Vanasse 

E. Regan M. Dizer 

I. Savery D. Leeming 

F. Wilder M. Mitchell 



□ 121 a 



First Row: Fcrrino. Stenberc, Mr. Nelson. Coach. Xadell. Blakeman, P. Bates; Second Row: Belcastro, W. 
Bates, Andrews, A. Smith. Sullivan, Ryan. 



Trade Basketball 

HIS year our basketball team had a very unsuccessful season. We won four 
and losl twelve. We started oil the season by losing several of our regulars. 
Blakeman. star guard was stricken with appendicitis; Kelly and Herlihy had 
sprained ankles; and tins intermingled with an epidemic of colds proved 
disastrous to us. It made the difference between a good season and a poor one. 

Our first game was played with Hingham. who beat us 31-19. The next 
game was with Southbridge Trade School, who beat us 39-23. We capped our 
first victor) oi the year in the next game by beating Somerville 32-20. Quincy 
Trade was our next opponent. We were on the losing end 35-ib. We then beat 
Everett Trade 37- 26 Waltham defeated us 37-31. Randolph beat us in the next 
two games 28-23 and 33-24. Somerville beat us in a leal thriller 30-29. Holbrook 
52-18. Quincy Trade beat us a second time 29 9. 

We found the old fighting spiril in the next, and deleated Holbrook 44-21. 

Hingham and Waltham beat us 46-20 and 47-ifi respectively. We then beat 
Everett 35-28, in our final game ol the season. 

Although we did not have a great team, we boys enjoyed ourselves immensely; 
and we take off our hats to a fine fellow and a good coach, Mr. Jalmar Nelson. 

The following boys made up our roster. 

P. Bates J. Rvan 

H. Blakeman W. Wyne 

E. Kelley W. Sullivan 
R. Stenberg J. Belcastro 
W. Pizzi W. Andrews 

F. Williams W. Nesbitt 
W. Eastey F. Santry 

E. Sloat H- Lysakowski 

A. Smith L. Nadell, Mgr. 

M. Ferrino Jalmar Nelson, Coach 

W. Bates 

n 1 n 



First Row: Nesson. Coveney. P. Bates, Blakeman, Maconochie, Sullivan; Second Row: Ferrino, W. Bates, 
Ells, Carter, Connell. Hall. Mr. Mann, Coach; Third Row: V. Costa, Stephenson, Wauley, Vanasse, 
Brennock, Ryan. 



Trade Baseball 

T the start of the year we had a wealth of material, but many of our sen- 
iors went to work, and we lost such stars as Blakeman, Kelly, Pizzi, George, 
W. Bates, and Gillis. 

However, the team did well under these unfavorable conditions and even 
though they won only two games out of ten, the fellows enjoyed playing to- 
gether. 

In the opening game we were defeated b\ Milton by a stoic of 19-2. This 
was the first time we had played Milton. Then Quincy Trade deleted us 10-5 
Next came a wild and wooly game with Cohasset who beat us in a slugfest 18-14. 
Randolph defeated us 20-2 for the first time in three years. Holbrook beat us 
11-15. ^ ve finally broke into the win column by defeating Somerville 18-17. 
Quincy beat us in a return game 1 1-8. We won over Holbrook 10-5 for our second 
victory of the year. In our last two games with Randolph and Somerville we were 
beaten 11-6 and 13-0 respectively. 

Even though we did not do so well this year, we expect to have another ban- 
ner year, next season, under the able coaching of Mr. Otto H. Mahn. 




a h — a ~~ — n 

AUTOGRAPHS 

Dumbest Huskiest 
Prettiest Cleverest 
Brainiest Funniest 

Just Friends — 



H 2 4 □ 




Weymouth High School are nearly finished. Only one thing remains— the prom- 
ised surprise. 

A distinguished-looking gentleman rises on the platform. In a solemn tone 
he addresses the group: "M\ friends, it is our profound honor and duty to hear 
the reading of an ancient and important document." 

Here an attendant brings a small gold-banded box to the stage , and hands 
it to the speaker. "The box," he continues, holding it aloft so that all may see 
it. "was unearthed from the must\ archives of the old High School. It contains the 
last will and testament of the Class of 1941, the most outstanding group of stu- 
dents ever to have been graduated from Weymouth High School." 

Opening the box, he extracts a yellowed parchment, which crackles with 
age as he unrolls it. He begins to read: 

"We, the Class of 1941, being of sane mind and sound judgment do bequeath 
to the authorities and to the young hopefuls who follow in our footsteps the 
following: 

To Mr. Whittle, we leave another undefeated football team of this year's 
spirit and calibre. May he pilot them on another interesting post-season trip. 

In case of another "flu" epidemic, we leave an engraved stamp to Mr. Lyons. 
Ii will be a remarkable timesaver in signing admittance slips. 

To the office we bequeath the winning personality of Miss Abbott, and the 
charm of her assistant. 

To Mr. Whipple, we leave a competent office force, to be found somewhere 
among the Juniors. 

We leave George Delorey's sportsmanship and co-operation to future foot- 
ball players. 

To the bewildered freshmen we leave "Hop" McKinnon's winning smile 
and curly hair. 

To future class treasurers we leave the sweet disposition of Phyllis 
MacDonald. 

To cheerleaders of future years, we leave Kay McAleer's "pep" and friend- 
liness. 

To all juniors we leave the athletic and scholastic abilty of Parker Bates- 



n 2 s □ 



To the next Vice-President of the Trade School we leave Gillis's ability to 

concentrate (head down) on class policies during ordinary class recitations. 

To the next Secretary of the Trade School we leave Xadell's personality and 
smile. 

To 212 we leave a coat of paint with which to brighten the friezes. 

To help the seniors of 215 to beat the bell at 2:30 p.m., we bequeath them 
Joan of Arc's white charger. 

To help stumbling seniors to stammer over French recitations, we leave 
those constantly flowing fountains of knowledge, Miss Canning's French dic- 
tionaries. Voila, mcs amis! 

To 217 we leave a can of varnish to be used on the tops of the desks. 

To 218 we will a new pencil sharpener, to sharpen the pencils with which 
the pupils have to write. "I will not chew gum". 

To 301 we leave an elaborately framed picture to decorate the walls. To 
Miss Norris we leave a newly patented bottomless cabinet in which to keep an 
abundant suppl) ol "math" paper. 

To prevent the asphyxiation of Mr. Martin and his class by the ardent, but 
erring, junior chemist we bequeath to 304 a suppl) ol Uncle Sam's newest gas- 
masks. 

To Room 3 we lea\e Mr. Whittemore's beaming countenance and a supply 
of afternoon session slips so that he will not be lonely at 4:00 p.m. 

To the struggling junior who strives for valedictory honors, we leave Muriel 
( lormack's intelligence. 

' o those who want main friends, we leave Margie Fisher's ability to win 
friends and infiuem e people. 

We leave the wit of Nellie Howsberger to be used in biology classes. 

We leave "Margie" Leonard's ability as chief drum majorette to the future 
drum majors oi Weymouth High. 

We leave Ruth Stub's ability to smile to some junior who needs it. 

To the underclassmen we leave Harry Belcher's humorous antics, and to 
future nimrods we leave his ancient fowling piece, reputed to have been the 
property of "Daniel Boone". 

With these words the speaker tone hides. For a w hile, a preplexed silence 
holds the audience- Then comes a ripple of laughter, which gathers volume 
like the wind blowing through the venerable maple trees towering above them. 

"Gum? French dictionaries? Football? Varnish? What are they? Some day 
we shall have to learn." Let us hurry to our planes; we must fly to New York 
now for our banquet and dance. Don't you think that the authorities here should 
provid moree hangers for our planes? We're rather cramped for space, you know. 

It is June 20, 2041. 



n i26 n 





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24- 


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65. 


MURIEL CORMACK 


25- 


MALCOLM PARTRIDGE 


66. 


KATHLEEN McGLYNN 


26. 


KATHERINE McALEER 


67. 


ANN GARDNER 


- / ' 


CARL AHLSTROM 


68. 


RICHARD BOSCHE 


28. 


PHILIP CLAIN 


69. 


MARY TURNER 


SO- 


MARJORIE MAJOR 


70. 


PHYLLIS FEIST 


SO- 


DONALD DRAKE 


7'- 


WILLIAM MEARA 


3 1 - 


HELEN CROMWELL 




FRIEDA NAEGLE 


32- 


JEANNETTE STONE 


73- 


DOROTHY WELLS 


33- 


AVIS BATCHELDER 


74- 


JOHN NOLAN 


34- 


ETHEL BOVNTON 


75- 


DOROTHEA LEEMING 


35- 


FRANCES HUNT 


76. 


MARTHA MORRISON 


36- 


ELLA WINTERMEYER 


77- 


ELIZABETH O'BRIEN 


37- 


MARY AUSTIN 


78. 


JEAN BLANCHARD 


38. 


PAULINE VENTRE 


79- 


ROY MUNROE 


39- 


HENRY BURKE 


80. 


RUTH STUB 


40. 


MARY DELOREY 


81. 


GLORIA GAROFALO 


4i- 


AGNES REID 


82. 


SHIRLEY HAZLETT 



□ 2 7 □ 




n 28 □ 




E3 12 9E3 



Mil HffiU^CT iHMMS 



BOY 



Arnold Brown's JIair 



James Panetta's Eyes 



George Reed's Smile 



Fred Chase's Intellect 



Don Drake's Stature 



John O'Connor's Dignity 



George Lvmburn's Humor 



Warren McKinnon's Disposition 



Dana Peaslee's Voice 



George Delorey's Sportsmanship 



John Nolan's Clothes 



Dominick Nista's Pep 



Alphonse Bakish's Dependability 



James Fitzpatrick's Naivete 



George Bailey's Complexion 



John Tower's Brutality 



GIRL 



Eleanor Hopf's Hair 



Phyllis MacDonald's Eyes 



Doris O'Connor's Smile 



Muriel Cormack's Intellect 



Ann Gardner's Dignity 



Ethel Brennan's Disposition 



Jeannette Ireland's.... Sense of Humor 



Mary Twomey's Voice 



Virginia Garrity's Sportsmanship 



Patricia Maddox's Cleverness 



Margaret Donahue's Clothes 



Katherine McAleer's Pep 



Margaret Lesenechal's 



Trustiuorthiness 



Margaret Bletzer's Figure 



Best wishes 

to the 
Class of 1941 

QUINCTS 
Fashion Center 


READ & WHITE 

1ElifW-L MEN'S and 

yEZf^ women's 
Kilt MAI 
W CL01 II ES 

ffS RENTED 

I I IIM Flllt ALL OCCASIONS 

^Jjr^9" QUALITY ALWAYS' 

111 SUM M E 11 STHEET, BOSTON, MASS. 
WOOLWORTH IJLUO . PROVIDENCE. It. 1. 

Try Our Jumbo Ice Cream Soda 
at, our New Soda Bar 

Hearn's Drug Store 

North Weymouth 


Qompliments of 

Twin Motor Sales 

North Weymouth 
Compliments of 

Gertude's Beauty Shop 

North Weymouth 

NORTH WEYMOUTH 
CO-OPERATIVE BANK 

North W^evmouth 

A ' V/A LAI w W *w V 111 W LA 111 

Shares always on sale 


CLASS POEM 
OUR TASK TO DO 

Across a sharttered, war-torn world, 

"Peace!" the nations cry. 

"O Lord, let us have peace and light, 

To ease this bomb-rent sky" 

What tasks are ours, who take up life 

In such a world as this, 

Where brutal greed and cruel might 

Scorn any friendship's kiss? 

If we but knew the thing to do, 

To hold aloft that light! 

It's up to us, to me, to you, 

To lead our country right. 

Let's bear no grudge to any man, 

Nor trample poor and small; 

But carry high sweet freedom's torch, 

To show the way for all. 

Patricia Maddox 



Corbo Bros* 

FREE DELIVERY 




ILcmhco mm 

1 Columbian Sq. - So. Weymouth 




Seats Reserved for Theatre Parties 






■ FREE PARKING j| TEL. WEY 2 7 77 




Meats 




Groceries 




Sea Foods 


South Shore Insurance Agency 
INSURANCE Established 1870 REALTOR 


751 BROAD STREET 


Charles H. Chubbuck 




EAST WEYMOUTH 




Telephone 2026 - 1485 


45 Washinston Square ' 




Weymouth, Mass. 




Weymouth 0098---1275 


JN. rUuu, jeweler 


I. BLOOM and SON 


Watch, Clock, Jewelry and Optical 




REPAIRING 


Groceries and Provisions 


17 Washington Street, Weymouth 






Tea, Coffee, Butter and Eggs 


Qompliments of 


LINCOLN SQUARE, WEYMOUTH 


A T" 1 • 1 

A rnend 


Tel. Wey. 0248 


Established 1875 


TEL. WEY. 1288 OPEN EVENINGS 


Elbridge Nash Drug Co. 




WILLIAM B. NASHCReg. Pharm. 




Call Weymouth 2388 for Delivery Service 
POl T JMRTAN SOI IARF 


HANSON'S 


South Weymouth, Massachusetts 


WAYSIDE FURNITURE 


Compliments of 


selectJyour furniture at warehouse prices 


Wallace H. Drake 


21 PARK AVENUE 




ROUTE NO. 128. SO. WEYMOUTH. MASS 



□ '33 Q 



BURDETT 
COLLEGE 




em THE TRAINING MEETS THE 



NEEDS OF THE TIME 



^Of til 



One- and two-year courses. Well- 
qualified faculty. Extra-curricula 
activities. Day and Evening classes. 
Previous commercial training not re- 
quired. Courses meet the needs of 
business and government. Calls 
for graduates exceed the supply. 
Catalogue contains full information. 



BUSINESS TRAINING SINCE 1879 



BURDETT COLLEGE 



Telephone HANcock 6300 



STUART 



mmecuate 
the j^ut 



diate demand 



opporlum 



tunitv 




LOVEEL 



BUS 



COMPANY 



SENIORS! 



For Practical 



Business Training " 

CALL: 

Mrs. Gilbert H. Irish 

34 Summit Road, Wellesley 
Phone WEL. 1755-W 
Representing 

New England 
Business School 

470 Boylston St., Boston 

Operated By 
The Babson Statistical Organization 
CO-EDUCATIONAL AND 2 YEAR COURSES 



Qh34Q 



Congratulations and best wishes 



to the class of 1941 from the entire 



personnel at 



THE REMICK COMPANY 

1571 HANCOCK STREET QUINCY, MASS. 



SADDLEMASTERS 



FACTORY PRICES 




Factory Shoe Store 

(Opposite Stetson Shoe Co.) 
South Weymouth, Mass. 



The FAY SCHOOL 

A Secretarial School for Young Women 

52 Beacon St., Boston, Massachusetts 



In a cultured, re- 
fined atmosphere, 
the student of the 
Fay School, through 
an intensive, well- 
planned, and diver- 
sified curriculum, 
becomes a compe- 
tent secretary. 

The two-year 
course combines 
academic and ex- 
ecutive secretarial 
subjects The one- 
year course is de- 
voted entirely to ex- 
ecutive secretarial 
training. 

You are cordially 
invited to visit the 
School at any time. 
Catalogue will be 
sent upon request. 




I 



Northeastern University 



College of Liberal Arts 

Offers for young men a broad program 
of college subjects serving as a foundation 
Idi iIh understanding ol modern culture, 
social relations, and technical achieve- 
inent. Students m,i\ concentrate in any 
ol the following fields: Biology, Chemis- 
try, Economics-Sociology, English (in- 
cluding an option in Journalism), and 
Mathematics-Physics. Varied opportun- 
ities available for vocational specializa- 
lion. Degree: Bachelor of Science or 
Bat helor of Arts. 



College of Engineering 

Offers for young men curricula in Civil, 
Mechanical (with Diesel. Air-Condition- 
ing, and Aeronatical options) , Elec- 
trical, Chemical, Industrial Engineering, 
and Engineering Administration. Class- 
room study is supplemented by experi- 
ment and research in well-equipped 
laboratories. Degree: Bachelor of Science 
in the professional field of specialization. 

College of Business Administration 




Offers for young men six curricula: Accounting, Banking and Finance. Market 
ing and Advertising, Journalism, Public Administration, and Industrial Admin- 
istration. Each curriculum provides a sound training in the fundamentals of 
business practice and culminates in special courses devoted to the various 
professional fields. Degree: Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. 



School of Law 

Oilers three-year day and four-year 
evening undergraduate programs leading 
to the degree of Bachelor of Laws. A 
minimum ol two years of college work, or 
its lull equivalent, required for admission 
to undergraduate programs. Case meth- 
od of instruction. 

The School also offers a two-\ear even- 
ing program open to graduates of 
approved law schools and leading to the 
degree of Master of Laws. Undergraduate 
and graduate programs admit men and 



School of Business 

Olfcrs curricula through evening classes 
in Accounting. Industrial Management. 
Distributive Management, and Engineer- 
ing and Business leading to the degree of 
bachelor of Business Administration in 
specified fields. Preparation for C. P. A. 
Examinations. A special four-year curri- 
culum in Law and Business Management 
leading to the Bacheloi of Commercial 
Science degree with appropriate specifica- 
tion is also offered. Shorter programs 
ma\ be arranged. Co educational. 



m cimen. 

Evening Courses of the College of Liberal Arts 
Certain courses of the College of Liberal Arts are offered during evening hours 
affording concentration in Economics English, Histon and Government 01 
Social Science. A special program preparing fot admission to the School of Law 
is also available. The program is equivalent in hours to one-half the require- 
ment for the A.B. or S B. degree. Associate in Arts title conferred. Co-educat 
iOnal. 

Co-operative Plan 

lie College of I.iheral Aits. Engineering and Business Administration ollei da\ programs for men 
only, and aic conducted on the cooperative plan. After the freshman year, students mav alternate 
iheii periods of stucK with periods of work in the emplov of business or industrial concerns at ten- 
week intervals. Undei this plan the) gain valuable experience and earn a large part of their college 

expenses. 

FOR CATALOG-MAIL THIS COUPON AT ONCE 

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 
Dnftliii itl Admissions 

Boston Massachusetts 

Please send me a catalog ol the 
I 1 College of Liberal Arts 
| | College of Engineering 
~\ College ot Business Administration 



I 1 School of Law 

Evening School of Business 
Dav Pie-Legal Program 
Evening— College of Liberal Arts 



Name 
Address 



n x 3 6 n